33,443 reputation
650178
bio website
location Stuttgart, Germany
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 8 hours ago

Sprache wurde für mich erst nach einem längeren Auslandsaufenthalt interessant. Damals habe ich gelernt, dass man tatsächlich in einer anderen Sprache denken und träumen kann. Man kann dadurch sogar einen Teil seiner Muttersprache (Schwäbisch) verlernen.

Seither interessiere ich mich dafür, wie verschieden Sprachen und Dialekte sind und wie gleich sie doch wieder sind, welche Nuancen eine Aussage klar machen oder verwässern, wie Mehrdeutigkeiten Spaß machen können.

Mit Sprache kann man jonglieren, balancieren und ohne Netz vom Hochseil stürzen.


Jun
14
comment “Hechel, keuch…”--what does it mean?
@embert: why not translate the essential parts to make it an answer here (or in the Q I linked to above)? An english refererence on Erikativ/Indikativ would be great for the site.
Jun
13
comment “Hechel, keuch…”--what does it mean?
It is usage of the "Erikativ" or "Inflektiv" - see german.stackexchange.com/questions/7054/…
Jun
12
comment How do you say “small rabbit” in German?
+1: that's the kind of answer we love to see here. Well researched and nicely written up.
Jun
12
comment How do you say “small rabbit” in German?
That would be a dwarf or pygmy rabbit.
Jun
8
comment If “Plattdüütsch” is a completely different language than “Hochdeutsch” (standard German), then why is it called “German”?
Everybody will agree on that. Dutch people say they speak "Nederlands", German people say they speak "Niederländisch" or more often "Holländisch". It's the language roots which are so close. Dutch is much closer to Low German than e.g. Swiss German is. It is more or less coincidental that we all do not speak Low German today.
Jun
8
comment If “Plattdüütsch” is a completely different language than “Hochdeutsch” (standard German), then why is it called “German”?
"Het Nederlands is een West-Germaanse taal". Furthermore it is no conicidence that the English name is Dutch (closest English language term to Deutsch).
Jun
8
comment “Ihr” as second person singular
„Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier, aber Schneewittchen ist tausendmal schöner als Ihr.“ - everybody knows that - so people are familiar with this kind of addressing people esp. in the context of fantasy/fairy-tales.
Jun
7
comment Reference for accusative and dative forms
related: german.stackexchange.com/questions/3674/… - Canoo.net are quite an exhaustive ressource.
Jun
4
comment How to include an English word in a German sentence?
You may be interested in the official rule §45 E1 which says so - alternatively we can build a composite Cloudprovider (but this hurts my eyes too much).
Jun
4
comment using “beenden” for “einen Kurs”
It'd be cool if you could elaborate (edit) your answer a bit. As it stands now it is a bit lean...
May
28
comment When to use 'ß' and 'ss'?
related: german.stackexchange.com/questions/255/…
May
26
comment Ich gehe morgen ins / aufs / zum Rathaus
Man kann durchaus auf ein Amt gehen, ohne gleich auf das Dach zu klettern!
May
26
comment Ich gehe morgen ins / aufs / zum Rathaus
Can we please have a better reference than Yahoo Anwers? Thank you.
May
23
comment List of 1000+ (most common) German nouns with plural form
Please note that the PorVoc project has been discontinued.
May
23
comment “vor Kurzem” with capital “K”
We should note however that the non-capitalized form "vor kurzem" is still preferred (but with decreasing frequency): books.google.com/ngrams/…
May
21
comment How do you ask for the meaning of a word in German?
cleared close votes after post edits (close reason invalid).
May
21
comment Finding suitable German translations for “micro-vibration treatment”
Thank you for that valuable additional information. Rather than in comments (which are volatile) it is better to edit your question to make sure all is at its place. For now I already did this.
May
20
comment What does “Da kommt sein Schiff an eine kleine Insel” mean?
To keep voting private is a StackExchange-wide policy which also means that there will never be a need to explain a vote in a comment. If there were no comments we could only guess what issues led people to vote as they did here. From what I can guess two issues of your post may benefit from an edit 1.) show a research effort other than a machine's translation attempt 2.) avoid asking two questions in one. See tour and Meta for more.
May
20
comment What does “Da kommt sein Schiff an eine kleine Insel” mean?
6 comments discussing Meta issues deleted. They were off topic to both, the question and the answer. Please discuss those issues in German Language Meta.
May
19
comment What is the difference between “in” and “im”?
@Emanuel: you are wrong there. There are usages when we can not separate im to in dem without producing a semantically wrong sentence. See my example where the meaning changes, and also have a look at the examples from Duden. BTW the dispute here shows once more that this is a good question which should not be closed. In case you have a better ressource than Duden telling something different you should write an answer rather than writing an unconstructive rant about Duden here.