33,735 reputation
651185
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location Stuttgart, Germany
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 41 mins ago

Sprache wurde für mich erst nach einem längeren Auslandsaufenthalt interessant. Damals habe ich gelernt, dass man tatsächlich in einer anderen Sprache denken und träumen kann. Man kann dadurch sogar einen Teil seiner Muttersprache (Schwäbisch) verlernen.

Seither interessiere ich mich dafür, wie verschieden Sprachen und Dialekte sind und wie gleich sie doch wieder sind, welche Nuancen eine Aussage klar machen oder verwässern, wie Mehrdeutigkeiten Spaß machen können.

Mit Sprache kann man jonglieren, balancieren und ohne Netz vom Hochseil stürzen.


Jul
3
comment What's the difference between “instabil” and “unstabil”?
@Milchgesicht: native vote rules here :)
Jul
3
comment What's the difference between “instabil” and “unstabil”?
@Ingmar: it's certainly not used as much as it's noun instability - but I did not want to mix this up here, and I wanted to show that the issue is not only a German related one.
Jun
30
comment Does 'Kritik' always come with a negative touch?
@Robert: this is important. It should be an edit to the existing answer here, or (better) an own additional answer (preferably in English as the Q was asked in English).
Jun
29
comment Historischer Gebrauch des Begriffs “Kanakermann”
@Milchgesicht: eine Referenz zum Gebrauch von "Kanakermann" wäre wirklich interessant. Falls jemand oder du eine findet, ist das eine weitere Antwort wert, die du dann akzeptieren kannst (auch wenn es deine eigene ist!).
Jun
29
comment What is abbreviated to “penn'”
To close voters: It is not to be expected that we will find an entry for penn in a dictionary. Do we really want a disclaimer "Folks I looked in this and that dictionary but my word is not listed" on each and every word request? If you don't want to see any of these questions at all please discuss this on Meta. meta.german.stackexchange.com/questions/698/…
Jun
27
comment Can the word “gelenk” be used as an adjective?
If you disagree, please discuss that on Meta: meta.german.stackexchange.com/questions/698/…
Jun
27
comment Can the word “gelenk” be used as an adjective?
Duden appears to be the only contemporary dictionary having an entry for the adjective gelenk. Please do not close this question for "lack of research effort". We should not expect a user to consult all dictionaries (including those he may have no access to) before asking here. For a non-native user Duden may not really be the dictionary of first choice.
Jun
27
comment Haben Wörter mit Endungen auf „-männin” sexistische Konnotation?
Makes me wonder why only the Irish Google presents us such nice tables.
Jun
25
comment Most terrible-sounding mistakes in German
Please use Meta for Meta discussion: meta.german.stackexchange.com/questions/693/… (12 off-topic Meta comments removed)
Jun
20
comment Bifurcation of the “ei” vowel in Yiddish: why?
@Crissov: never thought of this, but that's interesting indeed :)
Jun
18
comment How do you say “to have an oil change” in German?
@TomAu: thank you for your effort but in this case (where answers exclusively address the oil change rather than the grammar concept) I believe we should wait for another, more general question asking for the German equivalent of "to have sth + done".
Jun
17
comment “Ich mag ihn nicht” and expressing mild dislike of something
@DanLeifker: you can use it in writing too (but the more formal it is the more you may want to be specific).
Jun
16
comment # (number sign) and * (asterisk) in German
@stevenvh: that's fine ... soon we will find it with ease in a quick Google-search (pointing to us as reference) ;)
Jun
14
comment “Hechel, keuch…”--what does it mean?
@embert: why not translate the essential parts to make it an answer here (or in the Q I linked to above)? An english refererence on Erikativ/Indikativ would be great for the site.
Jun
13
comment “Hechel, keuch…”--what does it mean?
It is usage of the "Erikativ" or "Inflektiv" - see german.stackexchange.com/questions/7054/…
Jun
12
comment How do you say “small rabbit” in German?
+1: that's the kind of answer we love to see here. Well researched and nicely written up.
Jun
12
comment How do you say “small rabbit” in German?
That would be a dwarf or pygmy rabbit.
Jun
8
comment If “Plattdüütsch” is a completely different language than “Hochdeutsch” (standard German), then why is it called “German”?
Everybody will agree on that. Dutch people say they speak "Nederlands", German people say they speak "Niederländisch" or more often "Holländisch". It's the language roots which are so close. Dutch is much closer to Low German than e.g. Swiss German is. It is more or less coincidental that we all do not speak Low German today.
Jun
8
comment If “Plattdüütsch” is a completely different language than “Hochdeutsch” (standard German), then why is it called “German”?
"Het Nederlands is een West-Germaanse taal". Furthermore it is no conicidence that the English name is Dutch (closest English language term to Deutsch).
Jun
8
comment “Ihr” as second person singular
„Frau Königin, Ihr seid die Schönste hier, aber Schneewittchen ist tausendmal schöner als Ihr.“ - everybody knows that - so people are familiar with this kind of addressing people esp. in the context of fantasy/fairy-tales.