Reputation
723
Top tag
Next privilege 750 Rep.
See vote count; VIP usercard
Badges
2 9
Newest
 Editor
Impact
~6k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 80 votes cast
16h
comment What is the best German translation for the verb phrase “to upgrade software”?
There's really no big difference in the common usage between "upgrading" or "updating to a newer version" because a new version often implies new features, improvements, patches and keeping the program up to date in general. So the German "aktualisieren" works fine for both words in this particular context unless each term is specifically defined to mean different things in the documentation.
19h
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
I don't quite understand your last paragraph. How does accusative vs. dative have an effect on our understanding of time (one-time vs. long-term)?
19h
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
@Wrzlprmft It's just that it was easier to come up with examples for these two words where I didn't see any difference in meaning. But now thanks to your explanations it has become a bit clearer.
1d
awarded  Editor
1d
revised “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
added 12 characters in body
1d
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
@c.p. Exactly! I'm going to edit my question to make it more clear.
1d
asked “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
Mar
3
comment eine Frage nach / zu / über etwas
Thanks! This is the explanation I was looking for.
Mar
3
accepted eine Frage nach / zu / über etwas
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Dec
15
asked eine Frage nach / zu / über etwas
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
I appriciate your opinion and the opinion of the others who commented. I'm going to avoid saying "flüssiges Deutsch". However, this phrase is used by a lot of German-speaking authors in their books. That's why I had to ask.
Jul
24
accepted (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
@what Actually, "fließend" can be used as an adjective whithout any problem. According to Duden, in fließendem Russisch is a possible collocation. With "flüssig" and "geläufig" being the synonyms of "fließend", I venture to assume that "in flüssigem / geläufigem Russisch" are perfectly acceptable expressions. Anyway, my quesion was specifically about the article usage.
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
@what I can't agree with your last sentence. According to my research, unlike a nonsense "gasförmiges Deutsch", "flüssiges Deutsch/Englisch usw" seems to be a legitimate and meaningful expression. If you try poking around in Google Books, you can easily find hundreds of examples of this expression.
Jul
20
asked (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
28
accepted „Ausgeschlafen? Ne! Abgebrochen.“
Jun
25
comment „Ausgeschlafen? Ne! Abgebrochen.“
@HubertSchölnast Actually I was asked this question by an old lady in the morning today "Ausgeschlafen und abgebrochen?" And I didn't really know what to answer. Than I googled this phrase and found this on the internet.
Jun
25
asked „Ausgeschlafen? Ne! Abgebrochen.“