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Apr
20
comment What is the best German translation for the verb phrase “to upgrade software”?
There's really no big difference in the common usage between "upgrading" or "updating to a newer version" because a new version often implies new features, improvements, patches and keeping the program up to date in general. So the German "aktualisieren" works fine for both words in this particular context unless each term is specifically defined to mean different things in the documentation.
Apr
20
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
I don't quite understand your last paragraph. How does accusative vs. dative have an effect on our understanding of time (one-time vs. long-term)?
Apr
20
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
@Wrzlprmft It's just that it was easier to come up with examples for these two words where I didn't see any difference in meaning. But now thanks to your explanations it has become a bit clearer.
Apr
19
comment “zum Leben/Essen” or “für das Leben/Essen”
@c.p. Exactly! I'm going to edit my question to make it more clear.
Mar
3
comment eine Frage nach / zu / über etwas
Thanks! This is the explanation I was looking for.
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
I appriciate your opinion and the opinion of the others who commented. I'm going to avoid saying "flüssiges Deutsch". However, this phrase is used by a lot of German-speaking authors in their books. That's why I had to ask.
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
@what Actually, "fließend" can be used as an adjective whithout any problem. According to Duden, in fließendem Russisch is a possible collocation. With "flüssig" and "geläufig" being the synonyms of "fließend", I venture to assume that "in flüssigem / geläufigem Russisch" are perfectly acceptable expressions. Anyway, my quesion was specifically about the article usage.
Jul
24
comment (ein) flüssiges Deutsch / Englisch usw.
@what I can't agree with your last sentence. According to my research, unlike a nonsense "gasförmiges Deutsch", "flüssiges Deutsch/Englisch usw" seems to be a legitimate and meaningful expression. If you try poking around in Google Books, you can easily find hundreds of examples of this expression.
Jun
25
comment „Ausgeschlafen? Ne! Abgebrochen.“
@HubertSchölnast Actually I was asked this question by an old lady in the morning today "Ausgeschlafen und abgebrochen?" And I didn't really know what to answer. Than I googled this phrase and found this on the internet.
Feb
19
comment vorbeikommen - wo? oder wohin?
Is this sentence ungrammatical: "Während dieser Öffnungszeiten können Sie uns sowohl telefonisch problemlos erreichen als auch zu uns vorbeikommen und sich individuell beraten lassen!"? Should it be "bei uns" instead?
Feb
11
comment Bus fahren - usage and grammar
"Ich fahre Bus" means both "I'm a bus driver" and "I'm a passenger on a bus". Right?
Feb
11
comment werden-passive with reflexive verbs
@MichaelHärtl I provided the link above. If you follow it, you can see sentences like: "Ein Sechssitzer wird sich gewünscht.", "Acer Laptop in rot wird sich gewünscht =)", "Deshalb wird sich gewünscht, dass dieses Recht aufgeteilt wird." etc.
Feb
11
comment werden-passive with reflexive verbs
Do you mean it's bad German to say "Das wurde sich gewünscht"? Because Google finds a lot of examples of different variations of the phrase "sich gewünscht werden". For example here. I realize some of them are "gewünscht haben" which is different, but still
Feb
11
comment werden-passive with reflexive verbs
@Emanuel Does "Hier wird sich ausgekotzt" mean "Someone puked here" ? The structure seems strange to me that's why I'm trying to pin down the meaning.
Jan
23
comment Are there some mnemonic rules to use correct articles by gender?
@LarsBeck Nouns are usually assigned to gender without any semantic basis (physical attributes) and are rarely connected with the "real thing". It's called grammatical gender and it relies mostly on morphological or lexical features. This is true for most languages in the world (including all Germanic, Romance, and Slavic languages). Same thing in Russian, "машина" (mashina) -> car, fem. vs. "автомобиль" (avtomobil') -> car, masc.)
Dec
10
comment das or was: Relativpronomen
@Vogel612 "das ich je hatte" is not Plusqamperfekt. It's Präteritum. Plusqamperfekt will be "das ich je gehabt hatte".
Dec
8
comment Wo geht's hier zum Theater?
Thanks for the link explaining "es". @Vogel612 Why do you say "Wie gehts zu...?" and "Wie komme ich zu...?" and NOT "Wie kommts zu...?" or "Wie gehe ich zu...?". In other words, why does "gehen" work in the impersonal construction but not in the personal one?
Oct
14
comment “es ist/sind” versus “da ist/sind” to mean there is/are
So in case of da ist/sind you kind of split "dadrin" in two halves "da [bla-bla] drin". Thus, dadrin sind zerbrechliche Sachen becomes da sind zerbrechliche Sachen drin?
May
4
comment Usage of articles with “Schule”
@Eugene Seidel, I acutally was on DWDS but couldn't figure out how to restrict the search to "Schule without an article". But if I understood correctly, you usually use Schule with an article in German, unlike in English, except for a few idiomatic expressions.
May
2
comment Usage of articles with “Schule”
Thanks, but I know about the German cases. I was more interested to know when you can use Schule without any article like it is often used in English. Is "Schule haben" the only expression that does not use any article with Schule?