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Jun
25
comment How rude are these German words?
@Stephie I think that it's exactly the difference between the first, the second, and the rest that is relevant for a foreigner. The first one is informal, but not rude; the second one is rude, but on a level that I can still use among friends and family; the remaining ones are really rude (and partially insulting) and I couldn't imagine using them in public.
Jun
18
revised What is the particle “irgend” used for, or what concept/sentiment does it convey?
added 13 characters in body
Jun
18
comment What is the particle “irgend” used for, or what concept/sentiment does it convey?
@CarstenSchultz Of course, "at all" is redundant as well.
Jun
18
answered What is the particle “irgend” used for, or what concept/sentiment does it convey?
Jun
18
comment What is the particle “irgend” used for, or what concept/sentiment does it convey?
@Jan I would strongly suggest to the OP to delete the second part of the question (or at least the first part of the second part). As you say, the rest of the question is valid, and in fact it has an easy answer that should be given here. ("irgend" -> "no matter who/which/what/where/...").
May
27
awarded  Enlightened
May
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
26
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
answered “sich schaden” mit Akk.- oder Dat. Ergänzung?
May
22
awarded  Custodian
May
22
reviewed Edit “You got to be kidding me!” in German?
May
22
revised “You got to be kidding me!” in German?
deleted 12 characters in body
May
21
comment Where do you place the stress in the word?
@KilianFoth I think you're right that there is a trend towards shifting the stress to the first syllable, but how do you conclude that this is an influence from English? First of all, English adjectives are not always stressed on the first syllable (massive is, intellectual isn't), and second, the average German speaker doesn't even know where to put the stress in polysyllabic English words.
May
17
comment How is “tr” pronounced?
@jwcoding Concerning your first question: Yes, it's /t/ followed by some r-sound, and there are several possible r-sounds to choose (depending on the dialect), but there is never the glide effect that one gets when /t/ is followed by the English (or rather the American) /r/. Concerning your second question: I guess it's the same, at least for some English speakers (it doesn't happen with every possible English r-sound).
May
16
answered How is “tr” pronounced?
May
10
comment Verschiedene, noch heute gebräuchliche Versionen von Goethes “Prometheus”
Doch, ich würde die erste Strophe, im Gegensatz zu den folgenden, tatsächlich als Folge von Jamben auffassen. Für mich liegt auf "gleich", ebenso wie auf "pflückt" oder "-höhn" zumindest eine Nebenbetonung.
May
10
revised Verschiedene, noch heute gebräuchliche Versionen von Goethes “Prometheus”
added 27 characters in body
May
10
answered Verschiedene, noch heute gebräuchliche Versionen von Goethes “Prometheus”
May
10
comment Verschiedene, noch heute gebräuchliche Versionen von Goethes “Prometheus”
@rogermue Das kann nicht sein, es heißt nämlich danach "der Disteln köpft".
May
9
answered Confusion about usage of word “Limonade”