779 reputation
112
bio website
location United States
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Apr 22 at 20:18

I studied German in college and lived in Germany for a little while. My conversational skills are pretty good but there are some intricacies that I don't understand because I'm not a native speaker. I recently had a child and would like to speak German to her and am using a number of resources to improve my Sprachkenntnisse. Recently I came across the German Language & Usage StackExchange and am excited to have a way that I can post brief questions about usage and vocabulary.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
28
awarded  Popular Question
May
19
awarded  Yearling
May
1
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
17
accepted Was bedeutet “gerne” nach einem Verb in der Befehlsform?
Jun
17
accepted “to make faces” = “Gesichter machen”?
Jun
16
accepted Vergessen = “to forget” AND “to forget about”?
Jun
16
comment “to make faces” = “Gesichter machen”?
That's interesting. I just want to make sure I make the best choice here for the correct answer soas to benefit the community. Honestly, Takkat's answer is what I was "hoping" for! :) But if "Gesicht machen" isn't common or specific enough, these other options are definitely helpful.
Jun
15
comment “to make faces” = “Gesichter machen”?
So Takkat says that the expression "Gesicht machen" works just fine. Does that sound strange to you? Just wondering why one speaker wouldn't mention it and offer 3-4 other possibilities when someone else says the expressions are the same in both languages. Or maybe I just don't really understand the import of your statement that my original sentence "sounds generally okay."
Jun
15
asked Was bedeutet “gerne” nach einem Verb in der Befehlsform?
Jun
14
asked “to make faces” = “Gesichter machen”?
Jun
13
revised Vergessen = “to forget” AND “to forget about”?
spelled 'dass' with only one -s
Jun
13
asked Vergessen = “to forget” AND “to forget about”?
Jun
11
revised What is the difference between “versuchen” and “probieren”?
had wrong gender for Steak
Jun
10
answered What is the difference between “versuchen” and “probieren”?
Jun
10
comment Hinfallen, hinunterfallen vs. herunterfallen
Thank you, the note about "umfallen" was very helpful
Jun
10
accepted Hinfallen, hinunterfallen vs. herunterfallen
Jun
7
comment Hinfallen, hinunterfallen vs. herunterfallen
also man fällt hin, wenn man beim Rennen über etwas stolpert, weil er auf dem gleichen Niveau (auf dem Boden) bleibt? aber man fällt vom Ast eines Baumes herunter?
Jun
7
accepted “Aufheben” vs. “aufnehmen” for picking something up
Jun
7
asked Hinfallen, hinunterfallen vs. herunterfallen