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I love learning languages, programming; anything regarding computers and languages, really. :)


Dec
10
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
5
reviewed Leave Open Should a German relative clause directly follow the noun it describes, like in English?
Nov
28
reviewed Close When should I use Perfekt and when Präteritum?
Nov
28
revised Senden, Schicken, and Verschicken
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
27
awarded  Quorum
Nov
26
revised Senden, Schicken, and Verschicken
edited title
Nov
26
revised Senden, Schicken, and Verschicken
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
26
awarded  Cleanup
Nov
26
revised Senden, Schicken, and Verschicken
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
26
asked Senden, Schicken, and Verschicken
Nov
26
comment Wortstellung mit 'glauben'
The second one is the proper construction, however I hear native German speakers use the first construction frequently. I would like to know if the first is downright incorrect or if it is simply used for speed or another reason.
Nov
26
comment When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
@Chris I see that. Thank you very much. I'm grateful and it is much clearer. :)
Nov
25
accepted When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
Nov
25
comment When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
@Chris Thank you. If I understand correctly, whether or not the addition of "zu" is appropriate is dependent upon whether the verb can take a preposition or not?
Nov
25
comment When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
@Chris Sure. Using my second example, "Er hat mir einen Apfel gegeben," the sentence can be translated into English literally as either "He has given to me an apple" or "He has given me an apple." I was taught that in German, mir does not literally mean "to me," (it is simply the dative form of "me") but it is implied and that is how it should be thought of. Conversely, "zu mir" can ONLY be translated as "to me," from what I understand.
Nov
25
comment When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
@Chris I realise that English does not translate directly into German and I am not really having any issues with the memorisation of the cases that verbs may take. With due respect, I simply don't understand when to add "zu" and when not to. I am very grateful for your insight but I do not feel that your answer has addressed my question.
Nov
24
asked When “to me” is “zu mir” and not “mir”
Nov
13
reviewed No Action Needed Reason for irregular verb conjugation
Nov
5
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
1
awarded  Popular Question