580 reputation
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bio website http://---
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age 94
visits member for 1 year, 1 month
seen Jul 30 '13 at 9:12

language is courage


Jul
10
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
30
comment On “bei sich” in translation
@chirlu OK, Abbas is a person. I stand corrected. However, you haven't told me (yet) whether my translation is correct or not. Is it correct or not? And you haven't told me either what to do with bei sich in English. Practically, you have not answered any of the two parts of my question. But thanks for telling me Abbas is "one" person.
Jul
30
revised Is there a German-English dictionary in PDF (or that works offline)?
poor English
Jul
30
revised On “bei sich” in translation
edited title
Jul
30
comment Is there a German-English dictionary in PDF (or that works offline)?
For advanced users such as yourself, printed dictionaries are still the best. And they're always offline; hence portable, if you don't mind carrying along a 3 kg brick.
Jul
30
suggested suggested edit on Is there a German-English dictionary in PDF (or that works offline)?
Jul
30
asked On “bei sich” in translation
Jul
29
comment Indirect speech in this context
I merely wanted to know which of those two sentences is correct in German. If none is, you should have said so. If only one is, you should have told me which one is. But I don't need to hear that "It may not be absolutely correct"; this is an amateur way of dealing with grammar. Any grammar. And I certainly didn't want to hear that "everything else would sound too formal, use it only in written language!". I may know nothing about German, which is almost entirely true, but your way of answering questions about it is completely unsatisfactory.
Jul
29
comment Indirect speech in this context
@falkb I don't need to read about "backshift of tenses" In English. That was not what I asked. That's not even what this site is for. We're not on this site dedicated to the German language to ask questions about English.
Jul
28
comment Indirect speech in this context
@Em1 What is my question about? I don't know if I can get any more concise than that. I just want to know which of the versions in my question is correct. Is that so hard to give an answer to? And yes, theoretically I know everything about grammar. That's why I almost always ask this way: If I want to say... Because I'm trying to check if theory does indeed follow in the steps of practice. So what is so hard about that? This is my own method of really mastering grammatical theory.
Jul
28
asked Indirect speech in this context
Jul
28
revised Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
"To those answers to the question to which you've linked"
Jul
28
revised Is there any difference between “Vermögensteuer” and “Vermögenssteuer”?
added 5 characters in body
Jul
28
accepted Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
Jul
28
suggested suggested edit on Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
Jul
27
comment Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
@c.p. OK, all clear now. I hope no one's pissed off with my question, but there's still so much that I don't know...
Jul
27
comment Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
@chirlu OK. But why sagen will? In my textbook, this inversion is said to take place only with double infinitives: Das hat er nicht sagen wollen.
Jul
27
comment Is it “wenn” or “falls”?
@Em1 My question is, I think, quite straightforward: I simply want to know which one is the correct version for If I want to say. Is it Wenn ich will sagen (with wenn), or Falls ich will sagen (with falls)?