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Aug
19
revised Usage of “Speisekarte” and “Menü”
added 67 characters in body
Aug
19
answered Usage of “Speisekarte” and “Menü”
Aug
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
1
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
4
awarded  Yearling
May
26
comment “Have to” and “haben zu”
@Semple: If it is a "straight translation" from English, and English is a "Germanic" language, then the answer addresses the first question; the use in "other" Germanic language.
May
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
25
answered What does “alles” mean here?
Mar
9
comment Translation of the idiom “no harm, no foul” in German
@gnasher729: I said that "Wo kein Kläger, da kein Richter" is "probably the closest" to the English idiom, not that they were the same. Often, there are no literal translations from one language to another, only reasonable "equivalents."
Mar
2
accepted Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
Mar
2
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
@MartinSchwehla: OK, fixed. Thanks for your help.
Mar
2
revised Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
added 4 characters in body
Mar
2
answered Why “verschwende” and not “verschwendest” in this song?
Mar
1
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
@HubertSchölnast: Fair enough. Thanks for your help.
Feb
27
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
The question is in two parts: 1) Is my "default" translation (im Morgen) wrong? and 2) When are the times when it might be right?
Feb
26
revised Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
added 304 characters in body
Feb
26
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
@CarstenSchultz: I added an example and clarified my concerns.
Feb
26
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
Great answer on both counts. I kept the verses "in line" with the original French lyrics. It's from "Un Homme et Une Femme in 1966, before some people on this site were born.