340 reputation
110
bio website jaerhard.com
location Karlsruhe, Germany
age 48
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen May 16 at 21:32

Just some guy having too many accounts on too many sites (and most of those I can't even remember ;-)


Jan
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
24
comment Literal translation for “Mist”
Never? Why not? What if I want to say "Man sagt nicht Ficken!"? ;-) And... my parents said Scheisse all the time. Even when I was young. I fuckin' love them for it. ;-) Ooops... I'm sure most kids do learn them in school. :D
Jun
24
comment Literal translation for “Mist”
Wenn beim ICE die (Einstiegs-, nehme ich an)Tür wegfliegt, wird er wohl nicht nur "Mist" sagen. Da dürfte sogar "Scheisse" noch zu wenig sein. Vielleicht aber wäre er ganz einfach sprachlos... :D
Jun
22
comment Platonic term of “endearment” vs. “romantic”
Too small an edit for me: "hear", not "here" (I hate "Here, here!" if people mean "Hear, hear!" (german: "Hört, hört!"))
Jun
22
comment Difference between “Jaegermeister” and “Waidmann”
Careful: "Waidmanns Heil" is not equivalent to "good luck". So if you want to say "Good luck", you'd better say "Viel Glück". "Waidmanns Heil" usually does have a hunting conotation or evokes/requires some kind of hunting context. If someone told me she was hunting a bug in her code, I could respond with "Waidmanns Heil". Jokingly :D
Jun
22
comment How to differentiate between sie (they) and sie (she)?
You conjugate the verb differently... because "she" is a singular and "they" is a plural. At least in the example. Easy, isn't it? ;-)
May
24
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
comment A German equivalent for “The devil's in detail”
Isn't the correct English idiom "The devil's in the details"? Google... yup, Google and the rest of the world seem to agree with my recollection.
Feb
21
comment Vorläufer für “Wer traut sich jetzt noch Präsident?”
@Em1: Hey! Selbstbezügliche Sätze sind was für Sprachgourmets ;D
Feb
21
comment Vorläufer für “Wer traut sich jetzt noch Präsident?”
Dazu fällt mir nur "Ich mach dich Krankenhaus" ein.
Feb
21
comment Other interpretations of “darf niemand hier nein”
Surprisingly (for me), while there's just one "rein" in high german, while at least in badisch (strange, I couldn't find an English translation) and I think also in swabian, there are terms for "hinein" und "herein". "noi" and "roi" in badisch (badian?) and... well, "nai" and "rai" (I think) in Swabian.
Feb
21
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
18
comment Has “scheiße” become a “normal” word?
@Em1: Don't. Just... don't.
Feb
16
comment Am I writing these numerals correctly as words?
As the answers say, you're mostly correct... in the spelling. But you generally don't spell out numbers as large as 3600 or 1961. 36 can be spelled out, but that's already borderline.
Jan
15
comment “Schiffen gehen” — regionale Bedeutung?
@Em1: Der WP-Artikel enthält keine online überprüfbaren Belege. Und der Satz mit "schiffen gehen" bezieht sich wohl auf schweizer Benutzung. Dazu kann ich nichts sagen. Aber ich weiss sicher, wie meine Vorkommentatoren, dass ich "schiffen gehen" immer nur ausschliesslich in der Bedeutung "Wasser lassen" gehört habe. In Süddeutschland (Nordbaden) jedenfalls.
Jan
6
comment When is using “sau-” for emphasis inappropriate?
Personally: never. That's why this is a comment, and not an answer. ;-)
Dec
30
comment How to say “pull the plug” in German?
It's totally not what "pull the plug" means. Pulling the plug means it's dead. And you stopped it abruptly, without much warning. "Auf Eis legen" means to suspend it.
Dec
30
comment How to say “pull the plug” in German?
The literal translation seems to me to be an americanism.
Dec
28
awarded  Scholar
Dec
28
accepted “sprengen”: Wieso sprengt man Rasenflächen?