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Sep
11
answered Koppel's gender in “In der Eckerkoppel”
Sep
9
revised How to say “practice what you preach” in German?
typo
Sep
9
comment Is there a difference in the usage of “eben” vs. “vorhin”?
+1 - nice "graphic" example :-)
Sep
8
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
7
revised “schnell auf der Straße stehen” meaning
added some tags
Sep
7
answered “schnell auf der Straße stehen” meaning
Sep
7
revised How do I decline “jemand” or “niemand”?
see comments to question and answers
Sep
7
comment How do I decline “jemand” or “niemand”?
hmm - really interesting! Here's an interesting google ngram chart regarding this question - so, without doubt, in the year 2300 jemand and jemanden will surely be on the same level ;-)
Sep
7
answered How do I decline “jemand” or “niemand”?
Sep
6
comment About an “unusual” sentence structure?
exactly - for details on Wortstellung, see here and here.
Sep
1
answered “Gedownloadet” oder “downgeloadet”?
Sep
1
comment “Gedownloadet” oder “downgeloadet”?
so auch der Duden...
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
1
awarded  Analytical
Sep
1
revised How does one refer to a changed name in German?
typo
Aug
31
revised How does one refer to a changed name in German?
details regarding the legal background
Aug
31
comment When do suffixes “-able” or “-ible” translate with “-bar” vs. “-lich”?
@Debilski: you're right, it seems i mixed up transitivity with reflexivity. It's obvious since one of the pages i cited describes the semantics of -bar for both transitive and intransitive verbs. Hmm, another disadvantage of comments: you can't edit them any more after a certain amount of time... :-|
Aug
30
answered How does one refer to a changed name in German?
Aug
30
comment When do suffixes “-able” or “-ible” translate with “-bar” vs. “-lich”?
bewegen is a good example. You can use it as transitive or as intransitive verb, with corresponding adjectives: bewegbar in a transitive sense - you can move something, and beweglich as intransitive - something is able to move. For example, a locomotive can move "itself", but i (personally) can't move it myself, so it's beweglich but (from my point of view) not bewegbar. See also here and here.