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Feb
2
comment How would you translate “you have my vote” into German?
I prefer this word order because it emphasizes that I support the person's idea (stress on meine).
Jan
30
comment Is “to make one sigh” properly translated as “seufzen machen” or as “machen seufzen?”
@Feroc Maybe it sounds wrong to you, but it's not wrong. I found it in literature, e. g. gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/3788/20 and it's used in the Grimms Wörterbuch. I admit that it may sound better in Southern regions, but I'm not sure.
Jan
28
comment Was bedeutet eigentlich “laufen”?
I'm from South Tyrol where laufen always means running (rennen)
Jan
27
comment What to say after someone sneezes?
Related: War "Gesundheit" immer nur ein Wort?
Jan
24
comment Is “Erkennungsausweis” an actual word in German?
@Alenanno tessera is more a card, a Ausweis could also be a passport-like document. So, yes and no. :-)
Jan
24
comment Is “Erkennungsausweis” an actual word in German?
@Alenanno it depends what is really is; a Personalausweis is a specific official document issued by the a (local) authority. Maybe elektronischer Ausweis would be better.
Jan
24
comment Is “Erkennungsausweis” an actual word in German?
@Alenanno Maybe Lichtbildausweis would be the appropriate translation, because Personalausweis = carta d'identità; documento di riconoscimento means a superset of identity documents with photo.
Jan
24
comment Is “Erkennungsausweis” an actual word in German?
@Em1 I agree. This happens all the time here. Expressions from the Italian language get translated from people who shouldn't translate.
Jan
20
comment Is there a difference between “Leiche”, “Leichnam”, “Toter”, or “Verstorbener”
I'm not sure how Ngram handles sing./plural forms, but Tote is also a plural form: Es gab drei Tote.
Jan
18
comment Do all nouns from verbs nominalized by the suffix “-ung” have a female gender?
@harper sigh. Of course you're right. Apparently an emoticon plus bold j/k wasn't enough.
Jan
18
comment Do all nouns from verbs nominalized by the suffix “-ung” have a female gender?
Yes. Exception: springen, der Sprung ;-) (just kidding)
Jan
18
comment Why “herzlich” in “herzlich wenig”?
@Em1 Takkat asks about the etymology of the expression.
Jan
16
comment How do I use “arbeiten an”?
@blindfold I think you don't want to read that in a brochure.
Jan
14
comment Richtige Verwendung von “offenbar”
scheinbar ist übrigens nicht dasselbe wie anscheinend. Zum Beispiel: die scheinbar unlösbare Aufgabe (sie ist lösbar, sie scheint/schien nur unlösbar zu sein)
Jan
10
comment Origin of Separable Verbs
@Olga Welcome to StackExchange. This is not a message board / forum. It's a question and answer site, which means that you have to post questions as questions (button on the top right section) and answers as answers. Also, please take a look at the FAQ: german.stackexchange.com/faq
Jan
10
comment meanings inferred from “Das ist alles”
@Gigili yes, I guess so.
Jan
9
comment Gab es früher mal ein Verb “untergeben”?
Habe die beiden Antworten zu einer zusammengeführt.
Jan
5
comment Verschwundene und verschwindende Anglizismen
@0x6d64 Ich hingegen (Jahrgang 1970) kann mich gut an Slomo erinnern.
Jan
4
comment What does “ZZT” stand for?
@Gigili I suppose: a) the speaker on that tape didn't know what "z. Zt." is and just read it as abbreviation (what nobody in real life does btw) - b) the speaker wanted to be funny - which also seems strange.
Jan
4
comment Why is the meaning of “Triefnase” vs. “Rotznase” used as an invective so different?
+1 for mentioning that Rotznase/-löffel is referring to children.