349 reputation
26
bio website
location Switzerland
age 23
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Aug 10 '12 at 12:19

Computer Science student at ETH Zürich.


Jun
23
comment Is “…süchtig” temporary or lasting?
I would not ever say "Heute ist er eifersüchtig", because you don't just "decide" to be jealous, you're jealous of somebody, perhaps because he bought something you don't have. In that case, it is temporary of course. I think it's a question of character whether somebody is getting jealous easily. I would argue, though not being a native speaker, that the usage is virtually the same as in english.
Jun
23
comment Is “…süchtig” temporary or lasting?
Please note that "eifersüchtig" does not follow this pattern, it has a different meaning and means "jealous" and is not an "addiction" in the conventional sense.
Jun
23
comment How colloquial is “Er ist in Schwung”?
@Jan: I agree, I wouldn't say that to somebody directly either. But, when I talk to someone about them, I would say: "XYZ ist noch gut in Schuss für seine 75 Jahre, er geht jeden Tag 10 km Rad fahren."
Jun
23
comment How colloquial is “Er ist in Schwung”?
@mbx: Yes, that is correct. However, it still does not mean that you are physically fit. "in Schuss sein" on the other hand, when referring to people does.
Jun
23
awarded  Commentator
Jun
23
comment Is there a good translation for “Dark horse”?
Ja, ich denke auch, dass es keine richtige Übersetzung gibt. So wie ich das verstand, ist der "Rennpferd"-Kontext mehr als ein Beispiel zu verstehen, nicht dass "dark horse" meistens so gebraucht wird. Du hast natürlich recht, je nach Zusammenhang macht das eine mehr oder weniger Sinn.
Jun
23
comment “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
@mbx: I was not aware it was a regional variation, but it is marked now.
Jun
23
awarded  Teacher
Jun
23
revised How colloquial is “Er ist in Schwung”?
added 20 characters in body
Jun
23
comment “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
So basically a -1 because I mentioned a regional variation? The other points you critisized were do not appear in the answer.
Jun
23
revised “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
more explicit
Jun
23
comment “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
" Also, "Wir haben gestern über eine Stunde [lang] telefoniert." This sentence can change meaning depending on how the words are stressed. "Wir haben gestern über eine STUNDE telefoniert." That will be talking about a lesson. "Wir haben gestern ÜBER eine Stunde telefoniert." That will be a phone call that lasted more than an hour." Yes, that is already written in my answer.
Jun
23
comment “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
@teylyn: You have a point here. That's due to me being Swiss ;) Have a look here: blogwiese.ch/archives/584 It's strange though, when I think about the infinitive, I would always think of "jemaden anrufen", i.e. Akkusativ as in "dich anrufen" - my mind works in strange ways, I guess.
Jun
23
comment “telefonieren” vs. “anrufen”
@teylyn: It simply has a different meaning: You could say: "Ich werde dir heute abend telefonieren." Which means the exact same as "Ich werde dir heute abend anrufen."
Jun
23
comment Where is exactly the position of “nicht” in the sentence?
@Tim Pietzcker; @Gigili: It can be dangerous to draw such implications from written text. It may mean one or the other, if it is being said however, you can convey the different meanings by using an appropriate intonation.
Jun
23
comment Where to place “Bitte” in a sentence
I should note that it may have that meaning, sometimes it's just the speaking reminding himself that he should include a "bitte" in his sentence to seem more polite ;) Sometimes it just happens to be there for no particular reason.
Jun
22
answered Where to place “Bitte” in a sentence
Jun
22
awarded  Editor
Jun
22
revised How colloquial is “Er ist in Schwung”?
added 25 characters in body
Jun
22
comment Is there a good translation for “Dark horse”?
Nach der Bedeutungserklärung auf thefreedictionary ist "unbeschriebenes Blatt" sicherlich keine gute Übersetzung dafür. "unbekanntes Rennpferd" habe ich noch nie gehört. "stilles Wasser" kommt dem schon bedeutend näher (oder erfolgreicher Aussenseiter, aber das "erfolgreich" muss aus dem Zusammenhang ersichtlich werden, nicht explizit angegeben. @Glen Wheeler: behalten, nicht erhalten ;)