2,051 reputation
1525
bio website teylyn.com
location New Zealand
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 12 hours ago

Microsoft MVP - Excel

twitter: @IngeborgNZ


May
29
revised What are German words like Handy and Homeoffice called?
fixed minor errors
May
29
comment Welche Bedeutung hat der Duden im praktischen Gebrauch?
@splattne -- Danke für diesen Link!
May
29
answered Dasselbe vs. das Gleiche, what's the difference?
May
29
comment When is it OK to drop the first-person e, as in „Ich hab'“?
AFAIC, both the question and the answer were written in English. I don't see any issues with using common abbreviations for things like "by the way" or "as far as I'm concerned". Had my answer been provided in German, these abbreviations would have been out of place. But it was not, so they were not. What's the problem?
May
29
answered When is it OK to drop the first-person e, as in „Ich hab'“?
May
28
answered das Gehalt vs. der Gehalt
May
27
comment “Toi, toi, toi” – was genau bedeutet dieser Ausdruck?
Danke, ladybug, +1 -- das war mir nicht bekannt.
May
27
answered What is the German equivalent of foo, bar, baz?
May
27
revised Was ist das (der?) Effeff?
corrected minor errors
May
27
suggested suggested edit on Was ist das (der?) Effeff?
May
27
answered “Toi, toi, toi” – was genau bedeutet dieser Ausdruck?
May
27
comment Singular verb for plural subject
Oh, and by the way: Who is "the auditor"?
May
27
comment Singular verb for plural subject
It's your illusion. Or your pre-conception that is based on the structure of your native language. "Alles ist gut". "Alle sind im Bett". These are different constructs. "Alles" is a singular subject. "Alle" is a plural subject. The differences may be subtle and hard to understand, but they DO exist.
May
26
comment What do we have to take care of when trying to learn grammar from spoken conversations?
Every language has grammar rules. They differ from language to language, of course. All children pick up the grammatical rules from the language their hear in their surrounding. They don't need the rules spelled out to them to apply and internalise them. They will pick them up as they grow and extend their language capacity. Grammar being "bad" or "good" only comes into play when a "standard" is applied that does not match the local grammar rules, and as a consequence the local grammar is dismissed as being inferior. It's not. It's just different and happened not to be chosen as the standard.
May
26
comment What do we have to take care of when trying to learn grammar from spoken conversations?
Jemus, I'm not referring to the comparison with standard German and whether or not the regional grammar is correct in that context. I'm referring to the fact that a regional dialect has strict grammatical rules that are being followed by the community. It's not as if individuals just make up language as they want to. There IS a framework and it IS followed by the community. It may not be documented/written down/defined, but that does not mean that it's not "Grammar". Grammar is more than a rule book in a library. Grammar is a concept of rules that apply to a language.
May
26
comment Polite alternatives to “Grüß Gott”?
If you walk into a shop in New Zealand, two minutes after noon, and somebody says "Good Morning", eyebrows will be raised and hasty apologies will be distributed. All in a good-natured way, of course, but still, the time DOES play a major role in the "correct" selection of the greeting.
May
26
comment Is there a German sound that is similarly difficult for English speakers as th is for German speakers?
@Explorer: hint for pronouncing "ü" - Say the i: sound and round your lips while doing so. Say "fiehl" with rounded lips and it will sound like "fühl". Similarly for "ö" - say the e: sound with rounded lips.
May
25
awarded  Quorum
May
25
awarded  Suffrage
May
25
awarded  Mortarboard