180 reputation
7
bio website
location Continental Europe (sometimes Insular Southern Europe)
age
visits member for 4 months
seen 2 days ago

If you need to know more about me, be warned that of my personal website, only the CV is up to date, the rest has stayed untouched for years (mostly since 2002).

Stuff by me:


Aug
18
comment What is the Singular of 'Ferien'?
This is a case of a collaborative answer, which is not provided for by StackExchange. I think it would be more correct if Ingmar and @Carlster shared my +1.
Aug
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
28
comment Mixing of 'tschüss' and 'ciao' in saying farewell
@fdb, I suppose Raphael was asking what the Dutch word is, from which tschüss is supposed to derive.
Jul
28
comment Mixing of 'tschüss' and 'ciao' in saying farewell
As a small note: Italian speakers use ciau very rarely, and only as a joke. For German speakers, on the other hand, the final o is difficult to pronounce, thus the u. Other info can be found in Wikipedia
Jul
26
comment Is there a rule that dictates whether to use the eszett (scharfes S) or double s?
ß is a ligature - it has always been - between ſ (the long s) and z or (today exclusively) s. And BTW, the capital ß is a character in Unicode (U+1E9E, ẞ), so most serious fonts should have it. Anyway, my relatives in Germany have TROß in their passports (my Grandma came to Italy when ß was perceived more as a ligature than it is today)
Jul
2
comment Meaning of “Abgechecktheit”
now that you know, you can write an answer to your question, so we know too :-)
Jun
27
comment Semantische Vokalvielfalt
ich fände es interessanter, wenn es um Wörter ginge, die vom selben Stamm abgeleitet sind, wie z.B. Lage, lege, liege (mehr als eine Dreier-Gruppe fällt mir im Moment nicht ein, aber es müsste mindestens eine Vierer-Gruppe geben)
Jun
14
comment Warum ist das Beschreiben von Gerüchen (ohne Vergleich) so schwer?
Die Fragen sind interessant. Sind aber die ersten zwei, und auch der Titel, nicht OT?
May
27
comment Is it still good form to use a capital D for Du or Dir in a letter?
@bernd_k: ich bin auch mit "Du" aufgewachsen, bin aber gerne der Vorschrift von 1996 gefolgt. Für mich ist die Vereinfachung ein sehr "überzeugender Grund" (ich bin also total mit splattne einverstanden). Leider hat man jetzt aufgegeben, den privaten Schriftwechsel zu normieren, was andererseits auch verständlich ist.
May
23
comment Confusion with this ad by DB. Is it possible to omit the verb?
@Raphael, Latin only drops esse (to be) in complete sentences.
May
22
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
OK, acknowledged. Thank you Raphael
May
22
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
Was bedeutet Scheißscheiße?
May
22
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
Mit dem denn in ersten Satz bin ich nicht einverstanden. Das genügt nicht.
May
21
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
the translations for to defecate don't look like being appropriate for a small kid, unfortunately. I don't quite understand that Königstiger, though. Should the second slash be a colon?
May
21
comment Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
Wenn es stimmt, was Raphael in seiner Antwort sagt, hat kacken eine negative Konnotation, und ist daher nicht für den Umgang mit meinem Sohn geeignet (in meinem Fall würde auch der Anklang zum italienischen cacare dazukommen, was eindeutig eine negative Konnotation hat (im Gegensatz zu fare la cacca))
May
17
revised Why 'der' in 'Danke der Nachfrage'?
added 53 characters in body
May
17
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
It looks like one possible translation (not the best one!) is missing: "Mein Vater hat mir beigebracht, Fußball zu spielen". But this sounds a bit like "my father taught me that I should play football (not how to play flootball)"
May
17
comment Correct translation of “my father taught me to play football”?
I don't think that anywhere in the German speaking world lehren would be preferred over beibringen in this context, at least in spoken language. If anybody disagrees, please add a comment.
May
14
comment Idiom: einen Türken bauen. Etymology?
I don't agree. But this would be and endless discussion. Have also a look at the link I posted as a comment to your question (Wikipedia instead of Wiktionary - I should have said Wiktionary in my previous comments...)
May
14
comment Idiom: einen Türken bauen. Etymology?
See also: de.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C3%BCrken_%28Verb%29