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Apr
8
comment How do you say “I am almost # (age)” in German?
IMO this would be possible, but not very common.
Apr
8
comment Is there a german equivalent for 'prepper'?
I'm not sure what people think it they hear about a "prepper". In my mind preppers tend to be suspicious of the government and preparing mostly for a state of "without rule of law". This is a thing which is quite rare in Germany (good luck stockpiling guns :3) and the term "Überlebenskünstler" describes more of an Bear Grylls or Rüdiger Nehberg type of person. "Selbstversorger" on the other hand do not prepare for something, but are already living a certain lifestyle.
Mar
27
comment How to say “Thank you for teaching me that word” in German?
+1 for the (mis)use of "lernen" instead of lehren (IMO it sounds terrible). Note: You would use the dative with lernen: "Danke, dass du mir das Wort gelernt hast" (I cringe even when typing this)
Mar
24
comment “Each and every” auf Deutsch ausdrücken - wie?
Wie wäre es mit "alle Wege, jede Straße"? So etwas würde ich aber nur in einem Liedtext oder Gedicht benutzen, überall sonst reicht mir ein einfaches "alle" ganz gut. Man muss ja auch nicht alle und jede Wendung aus dem Englischen übersetzen :3
Mar
20
comment Difference between 'Ich sollte' and 'Ich hätte … sollen'
@Jamie: A little correction for your comment there: "Ich hätte mit ihnen gehen können"
Mar
19
awarded  Civic Duty
Mar
13
comment What is the German equivalent of the English “aka”?
@Feroc: Ich muss hier user unknown insofern zustimmen, dass ich auch glaube dass "aka" von einer großen Mehrheit aller Menschen in Deutschland nicht verstanden wird. Innerhalb meiner peer group dagegen hättest du recht: da wird es eine Mehrheit sein, diese Menschen sind im Schnitt jünger und beherrschen Englischen Netzslang. Ich mache häufiger den Fehler, mein unmittelbares Umfeld als Maßstab für alle Menschen zu nehmen, vielleicht ist dir das hier auch passiert. Deine Antwort würde von einer Ergänzung in die Richtung profitieren, finde ich.
Mar
12
comment What is the German equivalent of the English “aka”?
I certainly read "aka" in internet forums, but I never would use this in a spoken conversation, because I would not know how to pronounce it: "ah-ka-ah"? Sounds a little bit stupid to me and doesn't roll off the tongue easily. "ah-ka"? This will me (mis-)understood as "AK" (Arbeitskreis? Awtomat Kalaschnikowa?).
Mar
11
comment Abbreviations of Entschuldigung?
I think I never heard "gestatten" or "darf ich" in this context here in Germany. But I would understand the meaning, and it sounds quite nice!
Mar
11
revised Liturgical or church German
clarification
Mar
10
answered Liturgical or church German
Mar
10
comment “Von Des” vs. “Der”
There is an ongoing argument about whether "wrong" or "right" are good terms when talking about language or not. But I agree that in written language dem Mann sein Buch sounds horrible. In everyday conversation, I might use the dative from time to time without feeling bad about it.
Mar
9
comment When to use “gern” vs. “gerne”
@TheBlastOne: In my experience "hab" is not followed by an apostrophe in everyday use (which makes sense, since this would defy the purpose of making the word shorter).
Mar
7
answered Which of these is more common to say? - zweideutig, mehrdeutig, vieldeutig
Mar
3
comment Sie/du reciprocity?
Have a look at this question: german.stackexchange.com/questions/2420/…
Mar
3
revised Sie/du reciprocity?
edited tags
Mar
1
comment Does “frech wie Oskar sein” have a negative connotation to it?
+1 for the point that "frech" shifted it's meaning quite a bit. I would add to the positive meanings of "frech" the aspect of "not shy, self confident". I'm thinking of this rule of thumb: If somebody could be considered cute in a way, "frech" has the possibility to have a positive meaning.
Feb
13
comment Am I writing these numerals correctly as words?
For the date you must not use the word "Jahre" unless you say "am zwölften April im Jahr[e] XY".
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
comment Roman Numeral 2 (II) under Bundesadler
A picture (even taken with a cellphone) would help.