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seen Sep 11 at 11:47

Aug
1
awarded  Yearling
Nov
20
comment When should one use singular form of “hair”, when plural?
@Takkat: Thanks for the Leo links. It may well be that my observation is only valid for my immediate environment. Regarding your examples: I was thinking of a situation where someone is asked to describe how someone looks: "Sie ist ungefähr 1.80m und trägt eine Brille; sie hat hohe Wangenknochen, einen schmalen Mund und dunkle Haare." In this context I personally would find it slightly (only slightly) unusual to say "dunkles Haar".
Nov
19
comment When should one use singular form of “hair”, when plural?
@Takkat: I don't have a reference for it; this is just my personal observation. To be precise, I should have said that it's slightly obsolescent in everyday spoken language; it's quite usual in writing, and even preferred in poetic use. I only said "slightly"; one might not even take notice if someone used the singular in spoken language; but it's not what I would expect, and certainly not what I would use myself. Here are similar (and similarly subjective) views: dict.leo.org/forum/…
Nov
18
awarded  Supporter
Nov
18
answered Stammt “was für” aus dem Hochdeutschen?
Nov
18
comment “Kommt ein Mann in eine Kneipe…” - Wieso haben Witze diesen besonderen Satzbau?
Ich denke auch, daß dieser Satzbau in Hauptsätzen fast ausschließlich in Witzen vorkommt; das einzige andere Beispiel, das mir einfällt, ist "Kommt ein Vogel geflogen".
Nov
18
comment “Kommt ein Mann in eine Kneipe…” - Wieso haben Witze diesen besonderen Satzbau?
In den "Gegenbeispielen" steht dieser Satzbau in Frage- und Nebensätzen. Das besondere an der Witzform ist, daß er für Hauptsätze verwendet wird. Das einzige, was mir einfällt, wo es das sonst noch gibt, ist "Kommt ein Vogel geflogen" -- komischerweise auch mit "kommt" wie bei vielen Witzen, aber das wird vielleicht Zufall sein.
Nov
17
answered When should one use singular form of “hair”, when plural?
Oct
3
comment Is it “als” or “wie” (or both) that is translated, “as”?
Note also that some dialects substitute "wie" for "als" in the comparison, i.e. "A ist besser wie B"; standard German only has "A ist besser als B".
Sep
29
comment What exactly is the difference between “von” and “auf”?
These prepositions, like most prepositions in most languages, have myriads of meanings. I think to get a more useful answer you'll need to say more about which uses you're interested in. "Auf" does not have a sense "out of" as far as I'm aware; could you give an example of that? "Aus" does have such a sense. It does seem to me that you might mean "von" and "aus"; both can denote origin and it can be hard to decide which to use; "von" and "auf" don't really have much in common.
Sep
21
comment How to avoid using the relative pronoun “was” in this sentence?
This is wrong. I'm a native German speaker, and it would never have occurred to me to let "was" refer to "Thema". There is no rule that a relative pronoun only or even preferentially refers to the subject of the preceding clause, neither in German nor in any other language I speak. In the present case, "was" can only refer to "Thema" in its dialectal version, where it can take the place of "das"; in standard German it can only refer to "Word/PDF-Extrahieren".
Sep
21
awarded  Critic
Sep
21
answered How to avoid using the relative pronoun “was” in this sentence?
Aug
1
awarded  Teacher
Aug
1
answered Could a “Kerl” be female?