Reputation
1,937
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
1 11 31
Newest
 Deputy
Impact
~34k people reached

Jul
28
comment “Ich” and “mir” in the same phrase
You probably want to check reflexivity in any language. Including English.
Jul
27
comment Unterschied zwischen „effizient“ und „effektiv“
Die Frage ist berechtigt. So berechtigt sogar, daß es ganze Bücher zum Thema gibt. Die heißen Wörterbücher. Diese Website ist kein Wörterbuch. Ich stimme für Schließung.
Jul
27
comment Unterschied zwischen „effizient“ und „effektiv“
Nicht Zeit, sondern einfach nur Rahmenbedingungen oder Vorgaben welcher Art auch immer. Wenn man auf den Benzinverbrauch achten muß, oder aufs Geld, dann ist ein Taschenmesser klar effizienter als eine Kettensäge.
Jul
27
comment Unterschied zwischen „effizient“ und „effektiv“
Ja.
Jul
27
comment »Die Tür ist auf« vs. »Die Tür ist offen«
Die Frage in der vorliegenden Formulierung ist vollkommen unsinning. Es wird aus dem Nichts behauptet, "auf ist eine Präposition", und dann gleich im nächsten Satz vom Autor höchstselbst das Gegenteil bewiesen.
Jul
27
comment »Die Tür ist auf« vs. »Die Tür ist offen«
Was heißt "eigentlich grammatikalisch falsch"? Es gibt nicht sowas wie eigentliche Grammatik und nichteigentliche Grammatik. Es gibt nur eine Grammatik. Das, was Muttersprachler tatsächlich sagen, das ist die Grammatik. Das, was sie nicht sagen, das ist keine Grammatik. Ganz einfach. Wenn Muttersprachler "die Tür ist zu" sagen, dann ist das per Definition nie und niemals grammatikalisch falsch.
Jul
16
comment How do you say “geek”/“IT guy” in German?
The German word for geek is Geek. Or Computerfreak, if you must. But really, go with Geek. And hands off Streber, that has nothing to do with anything here. Not the same ballpark, not the same game, not the same sport.
Jul
14
awarded  Deputy
May
24
awarded  Yearling
Apr
28
comment Goethe - Prometheus - wie soll man eine Zeile verstehen?
Have you seen the plant? It has a flower head. And so you can decapitate it. Very straightforward. Decapitation is not limited to human beings.
Dec
2
comment Which usage of German is correct?
All three are ungrammatical. In addition to being nonsensical, as you can't read a daughter. Also, all three are punctuated incorrectly. And finally, it's German, with a capital G.
Oct
28
comment Was bedeutet “und zwar immer wieder”
The parse tree is "(und zwar) (immer wieder)".
Oct
24
reviewed Edit “Das ist nicht fair”
Oct
24
revised “Das ist nicht fair”
edited title
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
1
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
@Grantwalzer: springen–sprang–gesprungen-spränge → Springer; singen–sang–gesungen-sänge → Sänger. If that is not a valid analogy, then "valid" has no meaning. Also, I never said patterns didn't exist. I said they were random. And anyway: any pattern, by definition, is descriptive rather than prescriptive. Just because X and Y behave the same, doesn't mean Z will. Lastly, Zerschlager is very much a valid option; the only reason we prefer Zerschläger is by analogy to schlagen→Schläger (which is a very weak analogy to boot, as schlagen→Schlager exists as well).
Aug
31
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
@Grantwalzer "appropriate" is obviously weasel wording, and it's weasel wording for a reason. There is no rule that can cover all cases. It is random. You cannot explain away why it's Sänger but not Spränger. It is completely impossible. Existing words you just have to learn by heart. And new words are coined by analogy with existing words. If you can find no analogy, then it's a free for all. I would very much like to improve the answer below, but that would involve deleting nine tenths of it, and I imagine that wouldn't sit well with you.
Aug
31
comment Warum ist das Beschreiben von Gerüchen (ohne Vergleich) so schwer?
Daß Inuktitut "reich an verschiedenen Ausdrücken für verschiedene Arten von Schnee ist" ist leider ein Ammenmärchen‌​.
Aug
31
comment German word for “complete”
As a side note, can we all please agree not to misspell German on this site? That's outright rude, frankly. The german with a small g is an elaborate round dance, and it does not have a word for anything.
Aug
30
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
And that is all you need to know. The answer below is needlessly complicated, beating around the bush and raising two new questions for every question it tries to address.