1,776 reputation
1930
bio website ideas.lego.com/projects/39075
location Stadtmitte am Fluß
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 9 hours ago

Produktentwickler. Instrumentenspieler. Leser.

Oh, und ihr könnt für mein Projekt auf LEGO Ideas stimmen!


Sep
1
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
@Grantwalzer: springen–sprang–gesprungen-spränge → Springer; singen–sang–gesungen-sänge → Sänger. If that is not a valid analogy, then "valid" has no meaning. Also, I never said patterns didn't exist. I said they were random. And anyway: any pattern, by definition, is descriptive rather than prescriptive. Just because X and Y behave the same, doesn't mean Z will. Lastly, Zerschlager is very much a valid option; the only reason we prefer Zerschläger is by analogy to schlagen→Schläger (which is a very weak analogy to boot, as schlagen→Schlager exists as well).
Aug
31
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
@Grantwalzer "appropriate" is obviously weasel wording, and it's weasel wording for a reason. There is no rule that can cover all cases. It is random. You cannot explain away why it's Sänger but not Spränger. It is completely impossible. Existing words you just have to learn by heart. And new words are coined by analogy with existing words. If you can find no analogy, then it's a free for all. I would very much like to improve the answer below, but that would involve deleting nine tenths of it, and I imagine that wouldn't sit well with you.
Aug
31
comment Warum ist das Beschreiben von Gerüchen (ohne Vergleich) so schwer?
Daß Inuktitut "reich an verschiedenen Ausdrücken für verschiedene Arten von Schnee ist" ist leider ein Ammenmärchen‌​.
Aug
31
comment German word for “complete”
As a side note, can we all please agree not to misspell German on this site? That's outright rude, frankly. The german with a small g is an elaborate round dance, and it does not have a word for anything.
Aug
30
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
And that is all you need to know. The answer below is needlessly complicated, beating around the bush and raising two new questions for every question it tries to address.
Aug
30
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
Skip the googling and just use a dictionary. Here you go: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-er. It will immediately tell you both the term you can then search for (agent noun suffix) and that the exact same suffix is used in German (little wonder, both English and German being Germanic languages). The only difference being that German still uses umlauts and the infinitive ending -en, both of which English no longer does. So rather than tacking on the -er, you replace the -en with it, and umlaut the root where appropriate. Thus, zerschlagen → Zerschläger.
Jul
27
comment Concise way of saying “A list of things”
Both variants are utterly unnatural. And no, camel case is not proper capitalization in German, or any language for that matter. Anyway, a native speaker would say "Meine Sachen". As a title for a blog, "Meine Siebensachen" could be even better. But as others have said, it is not clear what you are really after, so it's next to impossible to make good suggestions. We can't even so much as say if you really mean Dinge, Sachen or Zeug.
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
edited body; edited title
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
edited body
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
added 1 character in body
Jun
22
comment Ein Mädchen im Kumpelmodus?
We can deconstruct the word at face value, but that's something you can do just as well yourself. Kumpelmodus = pal mode. What that actually meant in context is impossible to tell because little, if any, context has been supplied. We can only guess she friendzoned you (or everyone).
May
31
comment “Wegen dem, was er gesagt hat”
@MaxRied that is not how language works. By that metric, every single word in your comment is wrong and you should be writing Old English instead, or better still PIE. Languages constantly evolve, and this is but one minor instance of the constant evolution. Wrong would be "wegen deren, dass er gesagt hat", for example. But "wegen dem, was er gesagt hat" is not wrong, precisely because millions of native speakers all over the world produce it all the time. Even "wegen dem, wo er gesagt hat" is perfectly grammatical in various dialects, and might well become grammatical in Standard German.
May
31
comment “Wegen dem, was er gesagt hat”
"Because of what he said" ist ebenfalls umgangssprachlich. Beim Übersetzen soll man übersetzen, und nicht neu dichten. "Aufgrund seiner Aussage" steht nicht im Original, also darf es auch nicht in der Übersetzung stehen. "Wegen des von ihm Gesagten" ist schon näher dran, hebt es aber eben in ein zu hohes Register und scheidet damit ebenfalls aus.
May
31
comment Question about German definite articles
It's exactly the same as in English. "That was an order" vs. "The attack of Steiner's was an order". Pronoun vs. article.
May
31
revised Question about German definite articles
added 5 characters in body
May
27
awarded  Pundit
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
24
awarded  Yearling
May
12
revised When is “sch” spoken like “sh” and when like “s” “ch”?
deleted 1 character in body
Apr
27
revised What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
edited body; edited title