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Aug
31
comment Warum ist das Beschreiben von Gerüchen (ohne Vergleich) so schwer?
Daß Inuktitut "reich an verschiedenen Ausdrücken für verschiedene Arten von Schnee ist" ist leider ein Ammenmärchen‌​.
Aug
30
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
And that is all you need to know. The answer below is needlessly complicated, beating around the bush and raising two new questions for every question it tries to address.
Aug
30
comment Is there a way to form a “one who [verb]s” noun?
Skip the googling and just use a dictionary. Here you go: en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-er. It will immediately tell you both the term you can then search for (agent noun suffix) and that the exact same suffix is used in German (little wonder, both English and German being Germanic languages). The only difference being that German still uses umlauts and the infinitive ending -en, both of which English no longer does. So rather than tacking on the -er, you replace the -en with it, and umlaut the root where appropriate. Thus, zerschlagen → Zerschläger.
Jul
27
comment Concise way of saying “A list of things”
Both variants are utterly unnatural. And no, camel case is not proper capitalization in German, or any language for that matter. Anyway, a native speaker would say "Meine Sachen". As a title for a blog, "Meine Siebensachen" could be even better. But as others have said, it is not clear what you are really after, so it's next to impossible to make good suggestions. We can't even so much as say if you really mean Dinge, Sachen or Zeug.
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
edited body; edited title
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
edited body
Jun
29
revised Practicing German in daily activity
added 1 character in body
Jun
22
comment Ein Mädchen im Kumpelmodus?
We can deconstruct the word at face value, but that's something you can do just as well yourself. Kumpelmodus = pal mode. What that actually meant in context is impossible to tell because little, if any, context has been supplied. We can only guess she friendzoned you (or everyone).
May
31
comment “Wegen dem, was er gesagt hat”
"Because of what he said" ist ebenfalls umgangssprachlich. Beim Übersetzen soll man übersetzen, und nicht neu dichten. "Aufgrund seiner Aussage" steht nicht im Original, also darf es auch nicht in der Übersetzung stehen. "Wegen des von ihm Gesagten" ist schon näher dran, hebt es aber eben in ein zu hohes Register und scheidet damit ebenfalls aus.
May
31
comment Question about German definite articles
It's exactly the same as in English. "That was an order" vs. "The attack of Steiner's was an order". Pronoun vs. article.
May
31
revised Question about German definite articles
added 5 characters in body
May
27
awarded  Pundit
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
24
awarded  Yearling
May
12
revised When is “sch” spoken like “sh” and when like “s” “ch”?
deleted 1 character in body
Apr
27
revised What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
edited body; edited title
Apr
27
comment What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
No, you cannot. Losgehen means "start walking, leave by foot". The difference between losgehen and losfahren is, quite logically, that between gehen and fahren.
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
MAKZ, thank you for the edit, but I am still not quite sure what the question here is. As you yourself analyze, "kennenzulernen" means, quite transparently, "learn to know". (Nothing with "nice", though, that part is obviously wrong.) Also, why is the "zu" still bolded? Is that what the question is really about?
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
@Thorsten: fair enough, I have changed the close reason.
Mar
15
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
I hesitate to reopen because the very premise is just wrong. Lernen does not mean "to know", as a dictionary of OP's choice will be quick to point out. So the question right now amounts to "why do people say 'red car', if 'car' means 'car' and 'red' also means 'car'?"