1,806 reputation
1931
bio website ideas.lego.com/projects/39075
location Stadtmitte am Fluß
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Oct 30 at 19:50

Produktentwickler. Instrumentenspieler. Leser.

Oh, und ihr könnt für mein Projekt auf LEGO Ideas stimmen!


May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
24
awarded  Yearling
May
12
revised When is “sch” spoken like “sh” and when like “s” “ch”?
deleted 1 character in body
Apr
27
revised What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
edited body; edited title
Apr
27
comment What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
No, you cannot. Losgehen means "start walking, leave by foot". The difference between losgehen and losfahren is, quite logically, that between gehen and fahren.
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
MAKZ, thank you for the edit, but I am still not quite sure what the question here is. As you yourself analyze, "kennenzulernen" means, quite transparently, "learn to know". (Nothing with "nice", though, that part is obviously wrong.) Also, why is the "zu" still bolded? Is that what the question is really about?
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
@Thorsten: fair enough, I have changed the close reason.
Mar
15
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
I hesitate to reopen because the very premise is just wrong. Lernen does not mean "to know", as a dictionary of OP's choice will be quick to point out. So the question right now amounts to "why do people say 'red car', if 'car' means 'car' and 'red' also means 'car'?"
Mar
15
reviewed Leave Closed Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
Feb
28
reviewed Close What's the meaning of “kampfmittelbeseitigungsdienst”?
Feb
14
reviewed Leave Closed Do all German nouns start with a capital letter?
Feb
13
comment Why is »ß« substituted with »ss« rather than »sz«?
This argument does not hold water, as you do not "just read the letters" in German (or really any language for that matter). By your logic, it should be spelled "SCHTRASSE". Actually, no, even that is nonsense, as SCHT would have to be pronounced /st͡sht/ and not as /ʃt/. In short, you are perfectly fine with "substituting letters in your head" elsewhere, including elsewhere in this very word. You have happily accepted whatever conventions you were presented with. If the convention were to replace ß with LMP, then you would be just as perfectly happy with writing and reading "STRALMPE".
Feb
9
comment Wie sagt man “ What to wear? ” auf Deutsch?
In "what to wear" is nichts ausgelassen, schon gar kein "shall/should I" – das sind beides Modalverben, somit wäre in dem Satz kein "to" vorhanden. Vielmehr ist es einfach eine eigene Fragestruktur, Fragewort + Infinitiv, wie Du selbst anmerkst, die es auch im Deutschen gibt, dort allerdings ohne den Partikel zu: Was tun? Was anziehen? Wie weiterleben? Wohin fahren? Wozu anhalten? Warum nachdenken?
Feb
6
reviewed Edit Was ist der Unterschied zwischen “nördlich von” und “im nördlich von”?
Feb
6
revised Was ist der Unterschied zwischen “nördlich von” und “im nördlich von”?
added 4 characters in body; edited title
Feb
6
comment Context of words, and their meaning in English
I am still not sure what the question here is. The context has a serious effect on the meaning of absolutely any word in absolutely any language. As to nouns vs. verbs, that is a very weird question to ask from the perspective of English (and in English), a language in which absolutely any word at all can be used as a verb as is, which in German and other languages is exceptionally rare. So if anything, you should be asking the exact opposite question: how come zero derivation is not available for every German word.
Feb
6
reviewed Close Context of words, and their meaning in English
Jan
28
reviewed No Action Needed Wie übersetzt man “User Experience” im Zusammenhang mit Anwendungsprogrammen (Software) richtig?
Jan
28
reviewed Leave Closed Difference between “Unter” and “Zwischen”
Jan
17
comment Usage of 'éine' instead of 'eine'
+1 and you can stop calling this a hypothesis. A stress mark marks stress by definition, in fact by its very name. Spanish does this, Russian does this, Greek does this, and while German typically does not do this, the atypical usage is nonetheless quite transparent. That being said, in Modern German it's far more common to use italics.