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Mar
15
reviewed Leave Closed Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
Feb
28
reviewed Close What's the meaning of “kampfmittelbeseitigungsdienst”?
Feb
14
reviewed Leave Closed Do all German nouns start with a capital letter?
Feb
13
comment Why is »ß« substituted with »ss« rather than »sz«?
This argument does not hold water, as you do not "just read the letters" in German (or really any language for that matter). By your logic, it should be spelled "SCHTRASSE". Actually, no, even that is nonsense, as SCHT would have to be pronounced /st͡sht/ and not as /ʃt/. In short, you are perfectly fine with "substituting letters in your head" elsewhere, including elsewhere in this very word. You have happily accepted whatever conventions you were presented with. If the convention were to replace ß with LMP, then you would be just as perfectly happy with writing and reading "STRALMPE".
Feb
9
comment Wie sagt man “ What to wear? ” auf Deutsch?
In "what to wear" is nichts ausgelassen, schon gar kein "shall/should I" – das sind beides Modalverben, somit wäre in dem Satz kein "to" vorhanden. Vielmehr ist es einfach eine eigene Fragestruktur, Fragewort + Infinitiv, wie Du selbst anmerkst, die es auch im Deutschen gibt, dort allerdings ohne den Partikel zu: Was tun? Was anziehen? Wie weiterleben? Wohin fahren? Wozu anhalten? Warum nachdenken?
Feb
6
comment Context of words, and their meaning in English
I am still not sure what the question here is. The context has a serious effect on the meaning of absolutely any word in absolutely any language. As to nouns vs. verbs, that is a very weird question to ask from the perspective of English (and in English), a language in which absolutely any word at all can be used as a verb as is, which in German and other languages is exceptionally rare. So if anything, you should be asking the exact opposite question: how come zero derivation is not available for every German word.
Feb
6
reviewed Close Context of words, and their meaning in English
Jan
28
reviewed No Action Needed Wie übersetzt man “User Experience” im Zusammenhang mit Anwendungsprogrammen (Software) richtig?
Jan
28
reviewed Leave Closed Difference between “Unter” and “Zwischen”
Jan
17
comment Usage of 'éine' instead of 'eine'
+1 and you can stop calling this a hypothesis. A stress mark marks stress by definition, in fact by its very name. Spanish does this, Russian does this, Greek does this, and while German typically does not do this, the atypical usage is nonetheless quite transparent. That being said, in Modern German it's far more common to use italics.
Jan
14
revised What about “erschreckt” in addition to “bin erschrocken” and “hat erschrocken”?
edited title
Jan
13
comment Recycling Center in German?
I've never once heard "Recyclingzentrum" in my life, and while it's morphologically sound and the meaning can be guessed, it is not guaranteed to be guessed correctly, much less pictured. The key to translation is not just mechanically translating a word, but checking if the concept behind it is familiar to the target audience. And no German will take his cans to a Wertstoffhof, which are far and few between and where no money changes hands. What every German will do instead is take the cans to the nearest supermarket, and get back a whopping 25 cent deposit per can.
Jan
13
revised Recycling Center in German?
edited body
Jan
13
reviewed Leave Closed Recycling Center in German?
Jan
10
comment Difference in translation by capitalizing the first letter in 'How are you'
I am really sorry, but this is quite obviously a bug report for Google rather than a question for SE. Google Translate also translates "Freitagmorgen" as "Thursday Morning". That alone does not justify wondering if it's actually correct.
Jan
10
reviewed Edit “used to [verb]”
Jan
10
revised “used to [verb]”
formatting
Jan
10
reviewed Leave Open “Wegen” or “unter”?
Jan
7
comment Warum ist „Geschmack“ männlich, obwohl das Wort mit „Ge-“ anfängt?
Die alles überschreibende Regel ist, daß im Deutschen das Wortende das Genus bestimmt, und nicht der Wortanfang. Wenn man aus dem Ende nichts herleiten kann, sollte man es tunlichst vermeiden, etwas aus dem Anfang herzuleiten. Bestenfalls ist das Scharlatanerie, schlimmstenfalls Zeitverschwendung.
Jan
2
reviewed Approve “Wenn ich dir X sagen möchte” vs. “wenn ich dir sagen möchte X”