1,776 reputation
1930
bio website ideas.lego.com/projects/39075
location Stadtmitte am Fluß
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jul 17 at 21:51

Produktentwickler. Instrumentenspieler. Leser.

Oh, und ihr könnt für mein Projekt auf LEGO Ideas stimmen!


Jun
22
comment Ein Mädchen im Kumpelmodus?
We can deconstruct the word at face value, but that's something you can do just as well yourself. Kumpelmodus = pal mode. What that actually meant in context is impossible to tell because little, if any, context has been supplied. We can only guess she friendzoned you (or everyone).
May
31
comment “Wegen dem, was er gesagt hat”
@MaxRied that is not how language works. By that metric, every single word in your comment is wrong and you should be writing Old English instead, or better still PIE. Languages constantly evolve, and this is but one minor instance of the constant evolution. Wrong would be "wegen deren, dass er gesagt hat", for example. But "wegen dem, was er gesagt hat" is not wrong, precisely because millions of native speakers all over the world produce it all the time. Even "wegen dem, wo er gesagt hat" is perfectly grammatical in various dialects, and might well become grammatical in Standard German.
May
31
comment “Wegen dem, was er gesagt hat”
"Because of what he said" ist ebenfalls umgangssprachlich. Beim Übersetzen soll man übersetzen, und nicht neu dichten. "Aufgrund seiner Aussage" steht nicht im Original, also darf es auch nicht in der Übersetzung stehen. "Wegen des von ihm Gesagten" ist schon näher dran, hebt es aber eben in ein zu hohes Register und scheidet damit ebenfalls aus.
May
31
comment Question about German definite articles
It's exactly the same as in English. "That was an order" vs. "The attack of Steiner's was an order". Pronoun vs. article.
Apr
27
comment What is the difference between “losfahren” and “losgehen”?
No, you cannot. Losgehen means "start walking, leave by foot". The difference between losgehen and losfahren is, quite logically, that between gehen and fahren.
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
MAKZ, thank you for the edit, but I am still not quite sure what the question here is. As you yourself analyze, "kennenzulernen" means, quite transparently, "learn to know". (Nothing with "nice", though, that part is obviously wrong.) Also, why is the "zu" still bolded? Is that what the question is really about?
Mar
17
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
@Thorsten: fair enough, I have changed the close reason.
Mar
15
comment Why do you say Kennenzulernen?
I hesitate to reopen because the very premise is just wrong. Lernen does not mean "to know", as a dictionary of OP's choice will be quick to point out. So the question right now amounts to "why do people say 'red car', if 'car' means 'car' and 'red' also means 'car'?"
Feb
13
comment Why is »ß« substituted with »ss« rather than »sz«?
This argument does not hold water, as you do not "just read the letters" in German (or really any language for that matter). By your logic, it should be spelled "SCHTRASSE". Actually, no, even that is nonsense, as SCHT would have to be pronounced /st͡sht/ and not as /ʃt/. In short, you are perfectly fine with "substituting letters in your head" elsewhere, including elsewhere in this very word. You have happily accepted whatever conventions you were presented with. If the convention were to replace ß with LMP, then you would be just as perfectly happy with writing and reading "STRALMPE".
Feb
9
comment Wie sagt man “ What to wear? ” auf Deutsch?
In "what to wear" is nichts ausgelassen, schon gar kein "shall/should I" – das sind beides Modalverben, somit wäre in dem Satz kein "to" vorhanden. Vielmehr ist es einfach eine eigene Fragestruktur, Fragewort + Infinitiv, wie Du selbst anmerkst, die es auch im Deutschen gibt, dort allerdings ohne den Partikel zu: Was tun? Was anziehen? Wie weiterleben? Wohin fahren? Wozu anhalten? Warum nachdenken?
Feb
6
comment Context of words, and their meaning in English
I am still not sure what the question here is. The context has a serious effect on the meaning of absolutely any word in absolutely any language. As to nouns vs. verbs, that is a very weird question to ask from the perspective of English (and in English), a language in which absolutely any word at all can be used as a verb as is, which in German and other languages is exceptionally rare. So if anything, you should be asking the exact opposite question: how come zero derivation is not available for every German word.
Jan
17
comment Usage of 'éine' instead of 'eine'
+1 and you can stop calling this a hypothesis. A stress mark marks stress by definition, in fact by its very name. Spanish does this, Russian does this, Greek does this, and while German typically does not do this, the atypical usage is nonetheless quite transparent. That being said, in Modern German it's far more common to use italics.
Jan
13
comment Recycling Center in German?
I've never once heard "Recyclingzentrum" in my life, and while it's morphologically sound and the meaning can be guessed, it is not guaranteed to be guessed correctly, much less pictured. The key to translation is not just mechanically translating a word, but checking if the concept behind it is familiar to the target audience. And no German will take his cans to a Wertstoffhof, which are far and few between and where no money changes hands. What every German will do instead is take the cans to the nearest supermarket, and get back a whopping 25 cent deposit per can.
Jan
12
comment Translation of “Wir sind die, vor denen uns unsere Eltern immer gewarnt haben”
But "vor denen" is translated identically in both cases — "of whom", or, as you have done it, "about who". And the antedecent of that pronoun is the same in both cases, too: "the ones". So "the ones about who" is a constant, it does not change one bit every which way you translate the rest of the sentence. Your question here is who is warning whom, you the parents or the parents yourself. "Warned us" vs. "we warned". And that one is easily resolved as "us" vs. "we" are just as different in German as they are in English.
Jan
11
comment Translation of “Wir sind die, vor denen uns unsere Eltern immer gewarnt haben”
Could you please clarify how you arrived at the second option at all? Uns translates to "us"; "we" would be wir. The sentence is not ambiguous.
Jan
10
comment Difference in translation by capitalizing the first letter in 'How are you'
I am really sorry, but this is quite obviously a bug report for Google rather than a question for SE. Google Translate also translates "Freitagmorgen" as "Thursday Morning". That alone does not justify wondering if it's actually correct.
Jan
7
comment Warum ist „Geschmack“ männlich, selbst wenn das mit „Ge-“ anfängt?
Die alles überschreibende Regel ist, daß im Deutschen das Wortende das Genus bestimmt, und nicht der Wortanfang. Wenn man aus dem Ende nichts herleiten kann, sollte man es tunlichst vermeiden, etwas aus dem Anfang herzuleiten. Bestenfalls ist das Scharlatanerie, schlimmstenfalls Zeitverschwendung.
Jan
2
comment Is it an insult calling a lady “die alte Huhn”?
Ich kenne nur "die alte Henne".
Dec
29
comment Stellung von “auch”
An dem Artikel kann es nicht liegen. In allen vier Beispielen ist der Artikel unbestimmt – es ist nur so, daß er im Plural zu einem „“ verkümmert. „Ich habe Fahrräder auch“ klingt denn auch genauso schroh wie „Ich habe ein Fahrrad auch“. „Ich mag Fahrräder auch“ geht hingegen wunderbar. Also muß es am Verb liegen.
Dec
28
comment “Vor rund eineinhalb Jahr, seitdem habe ich dich kennengelernt, warst du eine andere Person” is correct?
One and a half is plural in German, just like in English.