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Apr
11
comment More on Ambiguous Diminutives
oh dear yes of course you're right about Vogel...but then is the diminutive the same as the plural (in Bavarian)?
Apr
11
asked More on Ambiguous Diminutives
Apr
11
comment More pseudo-diminutives like “Eichhörnchen”?
I'm not finding this word in Google translate....??
Mar
24
comment Does the German language have a Shakespeare?
Nice answer! Love the German Shakespeare translations.
Mar
24
accepted Could you spell Dutch according to the German system?
Mar
24
comment Can't find the word erfolgen in the dictionary
German (and Yiddish) dictionairies drive me crazy because the same verb is in 10 different places depending on the prefix. So when I published a transcription of a Yiddish memoir ten years ago, I organized the glossary the way I thought it should be...one root vert, with all the prefixes as sub-entries under the root. Sure enough, DERFOLG (all German er- words appear as der- words in Yiddish) is a sub-entry under FOLGEN. You can see my glossary at this link...it includes the last chapter of the memoir, plus the glossary. Here is the pdf link: onforeignsoil.com/pdf/Glossary.pdf
Mar
24
comment Could you spell Dutch according to the German system?
Interesting analysis. So you "get" what I'm looking for. It turns out that Dutch is a much tougher fit that Yiddish. I went through your whole list, and 90% of the German words would go straight into Yiddish with no change at all or in some cases a trivial or systemic change, like dropping the final consonant or changing long "a" to "o" or long "o" to "oy". The remaining (22) words mostly have very minor and easily recognizable changes, e.g. sterben goes to starben.
Mar
23
asked Could you spell Dutch according to the German system?
Mar
23
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Also: with respect to you as a German speaker WHO ALSO KNOWS ENGLISH reading a page of Dutch: in terms of Yiddish, you would be like a German speaker WHO ALSO KNOWS HEBREW. And you would then understand 99% of the Yiddish.
Mar
23
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
When I say dialect of German, I don't think I mean it's subordinate to Standard German. I mean its a variant of the bigger language called "German" in general. And as for your argument about mutual comprehensibility: it's hard for me, as an English speaker, to relate to that. If I went to a website and understood 95% of it, I would understand that I was reading some dialect of English.
Mar
23
answered Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Mar
22
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
You know you're cherry-picking. Here is your first example, with the spelling adjusted so readers can more easily distinguish the German from the Hebrew and Slavic components: "Mein éidam is nebbekh gewe’en a proster ba’al-melokhah, wâs hât kaum mit tsoros zunauf-geschtuckevet die biedne khayunah." There are altogether eight non-German words in this sentence, which is highly unusual for a sentence of that length. Typical Yiddish is much closer to German.
Feb
19
answered Was bedeutet „enttäuschungsfest“?
Jan
21
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
17
comment Asymmetrie vs. Unsymmetrie
Probably because I suffer from a low-level personality disorder which causes me to believe that my random musings are of great interest to the world at large. In particular, even though my answer is technically wrong, I still think it adds some valuable context to the discussion. Then again, that's probably the personality disorder speaking.
Jan
14
comment Asymmetrie vs. Unsymmetrie
OMG you're right, I completely missed that!
Jan
14
answered Asymmetrie vs. Unsymmetrie
Oct
2
comment What is the best translation for the term “snack”?
None of the correspondents have proposed "naschen". Is it only a verb in German, or can it be used as a noun.
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
10
answered Wann verselbstständigte sich das Tanzen auf vielen Hochzeiten?