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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
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Oct
18
answered Schreibt man 230 VAC, 230 V AC oder 230 V-AC?
Oct
18
revised Translation of “That is nothing to be proud of.”
added 177 characters in body
Oct
18
answered Translation of “That is nothing to be proud of.”
Oct
17
comment auf meinem Handy drauf
If it's a regional thing is it southern or Bavarian? Yiddish definitely goes to town with the prefixes. We say things like: "Ich bin 'erein-gekummen in Haus 'erein". I ask about the Southern connection because a lot of our patterns seem to resonate with the south.
Oct
14
comment Placing words between article and noun - common in German?
No, that's what the Germans are famous for.
Oct
14
answered Placing words between article and noun - common in German?
Oct
10
answered Some [singular noun]
Oct
9
answered What is the difference between “versuchen” and “probieren”?
Oct
8
answered Is there any difference in the words “roast” and “fry” in German?
Oct
7
comment How to translate “make no sense”?
And if used in the sense of "doesn't jive", it would actually be "einstimmen", as in "das stimmt nischt ein mit..."
Oct
7
comment How to translate “make no sense”?
If the German usage is close to "bullshit", it's quite different from the Yiddish. Here is an example in context from what we call "Yeshivish", the Yiddish-laced English spoken among the American ultra-orthodox: "As an aside, when I related this to the Rosh Yeshivah, he smiled. Ever the Talmudist, he replied, “Very nice, but shtimt nisht, not consistent with the the Gemara in Kiddushin [33B], which says a sefer Torah is on a higher level than a talmid chacham.”
Oct
7
comment How to translate “make no sense”?
I've checked some examples and it seems to be used in Yiddish very much in the sense of "it doesn't make sense"; or alternately, "that doesn't jive (with the facts)". And the German usage is different how?
Oct
7
answered How to translate “make no sense”?
Oct
6
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
17
comment Woher kommt die schweizerdeutsche Verstärkung “huren…”?
I don't think Jurgen is married if he thinks it's so easy to talk your way out of that one.
Sep
16
answered Preferred form of nominalization
Sep
12
comment Etymological relatives of English “put” and “get” in standard and dialect German
I wonder if you think SCHTUPPEN is related to put?
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Apr
10
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
comment What is “schlagen” slang for?
Yiddish does seem to go to town with the prefixes. The dictionary only gave me the stuff about nails for VERSCHLAGEN but I took a look online and found yet another meaning in this quote from Sholom Aleichem, talking about the effect of penny-romances on the female reader: "...as ihr kop is verschlagen mit fantazyes..." (that her head is stuffed with nonsense".