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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
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Jun
5
revised How to colloquially refer to things written on the blackboard?
added 649 characters in body
Jun
5
comment How to colloquially refer to things written on the blackboard?
Yiddish is as much on topic as any other German dialect.
Jun
4
answered How to colloquially refer to things written on the blackboard?
Jun
2
comment Mein Name ist Hase
Sounds like Sargent Schultz: "I know nusssSINK!". Nice website BTW.
May
13
answered Wie sagt man urinieren und defäkieren in der Kindersprache?
Feb
21
comment Various translations of the English verb “close”
yeah, the prefixes don't always take you in exactly the same direction. For "bequeath", we have "abschreiben", which also works for any transfer of ownership. Oddly enough, if the bailiff comes to confiscate your merchandise, that is also "abschreiben".
Feb
21
answered Various translations of the English verb “close”
Jan
29
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
29
comment Obwohl and wenngleich
There is a Bach cantata I learned in choir that goes "obgleich sehr wieder uns die Feinde toben...". Same meaning, right? Also old-fashioned?
Dec
14
asked Anwesenheit…simple presence or more than that?
Dec
8
comment Is it correct to use “ich sehne mich nach…” for inanimate objects?
We have "benken nach" in Yiddish, which I'm not sure is used German, although I think "bang" is a word. The Yiddish expression seems to work for either a romantic longing or, for example, a longing for home.
Nov
21
comment Was ist ein “Kurverein”?
In Yiddish a kurve is a prostitue (from the Slavic, probably a cognate of "whore") so on quickly reading the passage, I understood that you could learn of the condition of the winter trails by inquiring with the local Union of Prostitutes.
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Can you comment on my question about "die Oeffentlichkeit?"
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Thanks, Takkat. I found it...what an amazing resource.
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
what happened to the link to the word frequency charts????
Nov
18
comment Is “die Öffentlichkeit” the same as “the public”?
Well, it just seems like an implausible formation to go from the adjective "oeffentlich" meaning "openly" to a noun meaning "the general public". In English it went the opposite way...you had the latin "publicus" meaning "the public" (compare German "publikum") which became an adjective meaning "in public view", or "openly". So it makes sense to go from "the public" to "openly", but it doesn't make sense to go from "openly" to "the public". If you get what I mean.
Nov
18
comment Is “die Öffentlichkeit” the same as “the public”?
Not the answer I was looking for, but that's pretty convincing.
Nov
18
accepted Is “die Öffentlichkeit” the same as “the public”?
Nov
17
comment Is “die Öffentlichkeit” the same as “the public”?
Yes, I don't doubt that it's used that way. But I wonder if it isn't really a calque from the American usage. The common usage just doesn't seem to derive in any logical way from the adjective "oeffentlich".
Nov
17
comment Is “die Öffentlichkeit” the same as “the public”?
I don't think you've dealt with the more complicated meanings discussed in the Wikipedia article. I've edited my question to include the link so you can check it out.