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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
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Oct
6
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
17
comment Woher kommt die schweizerdeutsche Verstärkung “huren…”?
I don't think Jurgen is married if he thinks it's so easy to talk your way out of that one.
Sep
16
answered Preferred form of nominalization
Sep
12
comment Etymological relatives of English “put” and “get” in standard and dialect German
I wonder if you think SCHTUPPEN is related to put?
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Apr
10
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
comment What is “schlagen” slang for?
Yiddish does seem to go to town with the prefixes. The dictionary only gave me the stuff about nails for VERSCHLAGEN but I took a look online and found yet another meaning in this quote from Sholom Aleichem, talking about the effect of penny-romances on the female reader: "...as ihr kop is verschlagen mit fantazyes..." (that her head is stuffed with nonsense".
Mar
23
revised What is “schlagen” slang for?
added 1714 characters in body
Mar
23
comment What is “schlagen” slang for?
Touchee. I missed the Mad Magazine reference. Of course, this is a made up word, and Weinreich's dictionary does not include a listing for VERSCHLAGEN. So I was surprised to find on checking with Harkavey that it is indeed a real word; it means to nail something up, to secure by nailing. It turns out that Harkavey has a far more extensive listing of usages for SHLAGEN in all its forms, so I'm going to put them up as an edit to my previous answer.
Mar
23
answered What is “schlagen” slang for?
Mar
10
comment Wie sage ich “used to do” auf Deutsch?
Yes, this is also very much the Yiddish expression for "used to". It's funny that such a useful word would seem to have largely disappeared from the spoken language.
Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
When you say "let's clean up our comments please" I understand that you find something inappropriate in my comments. I do not feel I have said anything that needs to be cleaned up.
Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
Well, since you mention a "peinliche situation", I have to confess that although I am not a native speaker (or even reasonably fluent) I have had some extensive discussions on the nuances of these things, and I have the impression that a Peinlichkeit is more of an embarrassing situation than an awkward situation. Do you think German speakers would distinguish a Peinlichkeit from a Verlegenheit as I have suggested?
Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
The OP asked how you would translate "awkward situation" and I'm asking if "Verlegenheit" is a good match.
Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
I see. You have put me in an awkward situation...is that right?
Feb
2
answered What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
Feb
2
answered How to say in a positive, joke manner “you're a boring person” using a noun
Jan
30
answered Wird Deutsch auch außerhalb von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz gesprochen?
Dec
1
comment Pejorative gerund
This recalls for me an earlier discussion in which he offered the suffix "icht" as an instance of turning a verb into a noun with unsavory connotations. At that time he was only able to come up with kehricht (sweepings?) as an example. I wonder if anyone can think of others on this pattern? At the time, I had a number of Yiddish examples that seemed to use this form: spittings, shellings, smearings (speiechts, schallechts, schmierechts).
Nov
22
comment Difference between “antworten” and “beantworten”
Nice answer. I like the analytical insight.