975 reputation
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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 17 at 19:31

Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
If I'm understanding you correctly, that's a very good point. Would not Schande/Scham also be similar to Peinlichkeit/Verlegenheit in describing the event/emotion? Ich habe wegen des Schandes gefuhlt gross scham; ich habe wegen des Peinlichkeits gefuhlt gross Verlegenheit? I hope I've constructed grammatically correct examples.
Mar
7
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
Very nice answer! Yes, the three words recommended to me were scham, verlegenheit, and peinlich(keit): I put the (keit) in brackets because although the word seemed most apt to the situation, it seemed to flow more as an adjective than as a noun. One correspondent indeed also thought of "im boden versunken". I should mention that my other correspondent used "aus" rather than "vor". Would that be equally acceptable?
Mar
7
asked Shame vs. Embarrassment
Feb
29
comment Abbreviations of Entschuldigung?
Yes, it's an absurdly long way to say "excuse me". When I was learning conversational Yiddish I asked if I could just say "shuldig" but people found that idea comical. We also have a Semitic equivalent though, "sei mir moykhal (lit. "be me forgiving...".
Feb
6
comment How would one say 'I solved the Dirac equation.', and 'You solved the Dirac equation?'?
No, this is not a good question. It is taken from Richard Feynmann's autobiography where the author talks about learning Japanese, and how he gives up in frustration when he finds out that it's a completely different word depending on if he is solving the Dirac Equation or whether his Japanese colleague is solving it. It's a charming story about learning Japanese but has nothing to do with German.
Feb
3
comment Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
Sorry, my link was messed up. Fixed it now.
Feb
3
revised Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
deleted 1 characters in body
Feb
3
answered What does this German sentence mean?
Feb
3
comment Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
@Takkat: well, I supposed if you're going to worry about little things like that...
Feb
3
revised Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
added 470 characters in body
Feb
3
comment W → V, V → F. Why do German speakers wrongly transpose rather than shift when speaking English?
Really good answer. I like that word "hypercorrection".
Feb
3
comment Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
If that's really the only reason you're worried...because a teacher might take marks off on an assignment...then I'd have to say, so what? Sometimes you just have to do what you do and take your lumps. What difference does it make?
Feb
2
answered Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
Feb
2
comment Are second-hand books suitable for learning German?
I really don't want to be disrespectful, but isn't this a really really dumb question from a guy as smart as Takkat??? ;) Especially because saving money should alwyas be more important than having good grammar. (It's really just spelling, isn't it? Surely there aren't any grammar changes?)
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Andrew, I've responded further to your comment in reponse to Jules' post. I think it's an interesting test, and I wonder how it applies to Russian and Ukrainian, for example. And would v-to-w be a vowel be a consonant shift or a vowel shift? even in some variants of Yiddish there is a semi-regular shift where blaue augen goes to blove oygen; I think that still falls within your 1st category. Interesting that you don't set a percentage of core vocabulary which needs to be shared; are there examples of what would be dialects by your definition where only a fraction of the words are in shared?
Feb
1
comment Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Yes, the Weinreich quote is nice. I have to say that we English speakers are at a disadvantage when talking about relative mutual intelligibility, because for us either someone is talking English or they aren't. There are funny accents, but there are really no dialects. Having said that, I find the parallel with Dutch unconvincing. I don't think Dutch, for instance, would pass Andrew's test for consonant shifts, as Yiddish does. The interesting thing about Andrew is he doesn't seem to care how much vocabulary substitution you have: as long as the core vocabulary is common, that's enough...
Jan
31
comment Did the connotation of “emsig” change?
I just have to say that the pleasure of reading an intelligent, thought-provoking question like this argued so well is what brings me back to German Stack-Exchange. Nicely done, Takkat, and now I'm going to read the answers.
Jan
28
answered How should I ask politely for a moment of someone's time?
Jan
23
comment Welchen Ursprung hat das Wort “Pustekuchen”?
Poschut is a different word from the Slavic pust; it comes from the Hebrew and it means "plain".
Jan
23
revised Max and Moritz in alternating German dialects
added one more dialect