1,044 reputation
412
bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 8 hours ago

Oct
10
asked What is a “smart alec” in German?
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
23
accepted What's the matter: Yiddish “was is der mehr?”
Apr
18
comment Wie ist die richtige Schreibweise – “geliket”? “geliked”?
Do people use gleich in German as we say in American Yiddish, "Gleichstu mein kleid?" (Do you like my dress?) I assume I'm understand the use of "geliked" correctly here...
Apr
18
suggested suggested edit on Are there any rules how to build the diminutive?
Apr
17
asked What's the matter: Yiddish “was is der mehr?”
Apr
16
comment “bis der Tod euch scheide” or “bis der Tod euch scheidet”?
Thank you em1 for the fascinating analisys of the word play in this song.
Mar
28
accepted Noun-to-adjective: when does the vowel shift?
Mar
28
comment Noun-to-adjective: when does the vowel shift?
The funny thing about looking at the final "e" for guidance is that in Yiddish, we drop the "e" for almost all nouns except those that entered the language most recently.
Mar
28
revised Noun-to-adjective: when does the vowel shift?
added 504 characters in body
Mar
28
asked Noun-to-adjective: when does the vowel shift?
Mar
25
answered “Each and every” auf Deutsch ausdrücken - wie?
Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
How about..."the peinlichkeit of my big nose has always made me shy around women"?
Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
That's an amazing website, by the way. I think the artificial word "embarrassingness", which appears in one of the translated examples, best captures the meaning of Peinlichkeit: it is the embarrassingness of the circumstance that is embarrasing to you ("es ist mir peinlich"). That's why you don't "die from peinlichkeit" as you might die from embarrassment.
Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
So "my big nose has always been a peinlichkeit for me" (not a source of peinlichkeit!).
Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
I thought I was so smart for remembering (?) that wegen took the genetive case. And I actually caught myself on the verb order but then I thought, "nah, they can't be all that serious about that." I guess I was wrong. But seriously, these are very nice insights into the nuances. The question of Verlegenheit aside, I wonder if I am correct in understanding that a Schande is a scandalous deed, and a Peinlichkeit is an embarrassing situation? So you don't "feel" schande, and you don't "feel" peinlichkeit. You fall into a state of verlegenheit on account of a peinlichkeit...nischt wahr?
Mar
9
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
If I'm understanding you correctly, that's a very good point. Would not Schande/Scham also be similar to Peinlichkeit/Verlegenheit in describing the event/emotion? Ich habe wegen des Schandes gefuhlt gross scham; ich habe wegen des Peinlichkeits gefuhlt gross Verlegenheit? I hope I've constructed grammatically correct examples.
Mar
7
comment Shame vs. Embarrassment
Very nice answer! Yes, the three words recommended to me were scham, verlegenheit, and peinlich(keit): I put the (keit) in brackets because although the word seemed most apt to the situation, it seemed to flow more as an adjective than as a noun. One correspondent indeed also thought of "im boden versunken". I should mention that my other correspondent used "aus" rather than "vor". Would that be equally acceptable?
Mar
7
asked Shame vs. Embarrassment