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Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
The OP asked how you would translate "awkward situation" and I'm asking if "Verlegenheit" is a good match.
Feb
2
comment What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
I see. You have put me in an awkward situation...is that right?
Feb
2
answered What's a good translation for “awkward” in the context of “awkward person” or “awkward situation”?
Feb
2
answered How to say in a positive, joke manner “you're a boring person” using a noun
Jan
30
answered Wird Deutsch auch außerhalb von Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz gesprochen?
Dec
1
comment Pejorative gerund
This recalls for me an earlier discussion in which he offered the suffix "icht" as an instance of turning a verb into a noun with unsavory connotations. At that time he was only able to come up with kehricht (sweepings?) as an example. I wonder if anyone can think of others on this pattern? At the time, I had a number of Yiddish examples that seemed to use this form: spittings, shellings, smearings (speiechts, schallechts, schmierechts).
Nov
22
comment Difference between “antworten” and “beantworten”
Nice answer. I like the analytical insight.
Nov
15
accepted Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
Oct
26
revised How would one say that he has “finished” something?
added 843 characters in body
Oct
24
comment How would one say that he has “finished” something?
Ouch! I got my prefixes confused! Yes, in Yiddish it's also erschossen (except we say DERschossen). In my defense, I should say that my examples of "geendigt" and "ab-gegessen" were taken from reliable literary references. So I would still ask if those usages are mirrored in German?
Oct
24
answered How would one say that he has “finished” something?
Oct
21
comment Warum heißt „Fein Zucker“ nicht „Feiner Zucker“?
As a student of German and not a native speaker, the posted example raises the question in my mind: if "feiner zucker" is fine sugar, and "feinster zucker" is finest sugar, then how do you say "finer sugar"?
Oct
17
revised What is a “smart alec” in German?
added 501 characters in body
Oct
14
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
This is a tempting explanation because at a "carre"-four the meeting takes place in an orderly way, but at a "kugel"-four the coming-together is all jumbled up. Like Ox6d64, however, I would still like some substantiation for this.
Oct
14
accepted What is a “smart alec” in German?
Oct
10
comment Why does “Fresnel'sche” have an apostrophe and “Gaußsche” doesn't?
Nicely analyzed, Hubert, and as a math/physics guy I liked your examples.
Oct
10
comment What is a “smart alec” in German?
Nice observations on the nuances, Miura.
Oct
10
asked What is a “smart alec” in German?
Aug
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Question