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Jan
28
answered How should I ask politely for a moment of someone's time?
Jan
23
comment Welchen Ursprung hat das Wort “Pustekuchen”?
Poschut is a different word from the Slavic pust; it comes from the Hebrew and it means "plain".
Jan
23
revised Max and Moritz in alternating German dialects
added one more dialect
Jan
23
suggested approved edit on Max and Moritz in alternating German dialects
Jan
23
answered Welchen Ursprung hat das Wort “Pustekuchen”?
Jan
22
comment Max and Moritz in alternating German dialects
The brilliant and reclusive Leah Robinson has translated Max and Moritz into Yiddish. Here is a short excerpt. I have altered the phonetic YIVO-institute transcription to make it more German-friendly. The words in italics are of Hebrew origin, except for tcheppen which is Slavic. >Oy, wie oft hört men bei leut (rhymes with fright) >Schlechts vun kind in unser zeit! >Ot vun asa pâar mir wéissen (rhymes with caisson) >Wâs séi Schmul un Schmerkeh héissen >‘Stâtts zu musar sich zuhören (rhymes with sharin') >Un zu mitzvos sich zu kehren >Fleggen séi b’sod sein lachers, >Un derzu noch _khoyze
Jan
22
accepted Spittings, shellings, etc
Jan
22
comment Spittings, shellings, etc
Yes, that's perfect. What dialect is that found in, and can you think of any more examples?
Jan
22
revised Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
deleted 19 characters in body
Jan
22
asked Is Yiddish a dialect of German?
Jan
22
revised Spittings, shellings, etc
added 175 characters in body
Jan
22
comment Spittings, shellings, etc
Yes, of course Yiddish has "ung" as well. The funny thing about the "echts" ending is that it always seems to make an unsavory substance out of an action.
Jan
22
asked Spittings, shellings, etc
Jan
12
answered Is it acceptable to omit umlauts and put an extra 'e' instead?
Dec
21
accepted “noch immer” vs “immer noch”
Dec
20
comment Continuing situations in German
Let me add that "immer noch" is a favorite phrase of mine: I use it in the clubs when I sing the last verse of Bobby Helms' "Frauelein": "bei die Stirne so hoch, ich liebe dich immer noch" (my own broken German translation). I hate to think I am expressing a more negative sentiment than intended. Would it be the same if I sang "ich liebe dich noch immer"?
Dec
20
comment Continuing situations in German
Because once a discussion goes so deep into the comment field it doesn't appear live to the wider audience. My question deals with a specific nuance: it is true that the correspondents in this thread have told me I am mistaken, but I can't quite believe it. I am only a long-time student of German, but I never knew the negative connotation of "noch immer" until the discsussion several months ago; and now, in the present discussion, it is claimed there there is no distinction between noch immer vs immer noch. I just want the question before a wider audience.
Dec
20
asked “noch immer” vs “immer noch”
Dec
20
comment Continuing situations in German
Okay, you guys are right, the question of noch immer vs immer noch was touched on only peripherally in that other discussion. I'm going to post it as a fresh question.
Dec
20
comment Continuing situations in German
So what were we all talking about in that other thread?