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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

Dec
8
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
answered my own question
Dec
7
comment Wie übersetzt man 'Oh, a fellow Swiss'?
I think I'm understanding from your explanation that the expression has fallen out of use to the extent that it now calls for explanation even among native German speakers? Interestingly many languages have the identical expression, especially when the speakers feel themselves to be part of a distinct group immersed in a larger culture. I doubt, for example, that the Italian "paesano" means as much in Italy as it does in America. My wife's people, the Chiu Chao minority, proudly identify each other as "ka ki nang". Of course "landsmann" is very much a Yiddish expression.
Dec
5
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
I see. But you don't seem to have explained the source of your skepticism, unless I'm missing something. Is there some reason you don't buy the military explanation?
Dec
5
answered Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
Dec
5
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
added 140 characters in body
Dec
4
comment “Es hat”: synonym for “es gibt”?
@Matt The term may be politically charged, but I wouldn't hesitate to call it a dialect. For a deeper discussion, you might want to post this as a separate question?
Dec
4
answered “Es hat”: synonym for “es gibt”?
Dec
2
comment Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
What cool references you have found. This is an excellent answer as usual, Takkat; and since it answers my question, I really ought to check it off as "answer accepted". I hesitate to do so only because I'm hoping someone else might still answer the unasked question: where did Yiddish come up with those constructions if not from Old German?
Dec
1
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
added 134 characters in body
Dec
1
asked Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
Nov
29
comment Is “Lass uns uns treffen” correct?
We dodge this bullet in Yiddish by using "sich" for all the reflexives: "lomir sich treffen (=lass wir sich treffen) or even "ich hab' sich die haendt gewascht".
Nov
29
comment How is the equivalent of the English “Let's …” formed?
I'm gratified that you enjoyed it. The "pr" is for "pronounced". (I like to spell Yiddish according to the German system, but that tends to obscure some of the vowel shifts.)
Nov
29
answered How is the equivalent of the English “Let's …” formed?
Nov
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I think you understand that I was comparing the pathway Old Prussian => German with the corresponding pathway Lithuanian => Yiddish. What has always baffled me is the disparity between the ease with which we import words from Polish and Ukrainian as compared to the paucity of words from such coterritorial sources as Lithuanian and Hungarian.
Nov
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
Your "flins" looks like the Yiddish "blintz", but according to Wikipedia this derives from the Slavin "mlin" meaning "mill". Of course the Old Prussian could be related to the Slavic. Similarly, one of the few Yiddish words we trace to Lithuanian is "bulbes" (potatoes), where the Lithuaninan "bulve" is also apparently an import via the Polish "bulwa" for a root that seems to mean bulb everywhere in Europe. (I owe the analysis of "bulbes" to the following article by one Philologos in the Jewish Daily Forward). EDIT: Oops: I meant
Nov
29
comment Was wäre eine gute Übersetzung für “Mince Pie” oder “Pickles”?
Pickles unavailable? When I visited Frankfurt five years ago I marvelled at the big jars of pickles on sale for 1 euro, which would have cost $3 here at home. As an aside, in Yiddish we say "ugerkes" (accent on the first syllable), obviously from the Polish "ogorki". I never noticed the connection to "gherkins" before.
Nov
27
accepted Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Nov
27
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Interesting. It definitely took off in both languages around 1950, just ahead of either the book or the movie. So I guess Herman Wouk was following the zeitgeist and not the other way around.
Nov
27
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Nice! Verfolgungswahn is awesome. German truly is the Master Language! I'm still really interested in the Caine Mutiny connection, the expression is so common today, but in the movie it's like they needed a psychiatrist to explain what paranoia even was. Can someone do one of those word frequency charts I sometimes see here, where they show the frequency of usage over time? I wonder if it took off after 1954.
Nov
27
asked Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?