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Dec
18
comment Why is “Zeile” but not “Zeiger” differently pronounced in the south?
I still don't get it. I'm looking at what Takkat wrote earlier: "Zeit is 'ei' in Swabian even though it shares the same etymology as Zeiger ('ai')". I'm undertanding from him that Zeit rhymes with plate and Zeiger rhymes with Tiger. From you I'm understanding that Zeiger rhymes very approximately with bugger and Zeit with tight...isn't this very different from what Takkat said?
Dec
18
comment Why is “Zeile” but not “Zeiger” differently pronounced in the south?
I am REALLY not understanding your phonetics anymore. Are you saying now Zeiger rhymes with blogger and zeit rhymes with tight, or what?
Dec
17
comment Why is “Zeile” but not “Zeiger” differently pronounced in the south?
In Yiddish we have "tsayt" and "zeyger" (rhymes with "height" and "flavor". Opposites again? (BTW a "zeyger" is a wristwatch; it's a very rare case of the German z going over to a hard-s in Yiddish.)
Dec
17
comment Why is “Zeile” but not “Zeiger” differently pronounced in the south?
That's wierd. I always assumed that the vowel shift was a residue of an obsolete German usage which somehow later merged. I don't see how it would actually flip over. Any more examples I could check against?
Dec
16
comment Why is “Zeile” but not “Zeiger” differently pronounced in the south?
The vowel bifurcates in Yiddish and I can give you a list of words in each category, but it almost looks like the opposite of what you're showing here? You haven't clarified in your list of six examples which are ai and which are ei...in Yiddish it woud be ays, vays, and baisen (same as standard German) vs. beyn and veys, where the vowel shifts.. I hope my phonetic spelling is self-explanatory.
Dec
15
comment “Darum -— ich mir ein Auto.”
"I rent myself out as a teacher". "I rent a car". It might not sound right in modern German, but that's the verb we use in Yiddish. If it sounds so wrong to you maybe it's because you've inserted the infinitive form directly into the blanks. Try the same thing with the verbs suggested by Tohuwawohu (leihen, mieten, nehmen) and you'll see they're just as wrong, or just as right.
Dec
8
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
answered my own question
Dec
7
comment Wie übersetzt man 'Oh, a fellow Swiss'?
I think I'm understanding from your explanation that the expression has fallen out of use to the extent that it now calls for explanation even among native German speakers? Interestingly many languages have the identical expression, especially when the speakers feel themselves to be part of a distinct group immersed in a larger culture. I doubt, for example, that the Italian "paesano" means as much in Italy as it does in America. My wife's people, the Chiu Chao minority, proudly identify each other as "ka ki nang". Of course "landsmann" is very much a Yiddish expression.
Dec
5
comment Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
I see. But you don't seem to have explained the source of your skepticism, unless I'm missing something. Is there some reason you don't buy the military explanation?
Dec
5
answered Woher stammt der schwäbische Begriff “Kugelfuhr”?
Dec
5
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
added 140 characters in body
Dec
4
comment “Es hat”: synonym for “es gibt”?
@Matt The term may be politically charged, but I wouldn't hesitate to call it a dialect. For a deeper discussion, you might want to post this as a separate question?
Dec
4
answered “Es hat”: synonym for “es gibt”?
Dec
2
comment Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
What cool references you have found. This is an excellent answer as usual, Takkat; and since it answers my question, I really ought to check it off as "answer accepted". I hesitate to do so only because I'm hoping someone else might still answer the unasked question: where did Yiddish come up with those constructions if not from Old German?
Dec
1
revised Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
added 134 characters in body
Dec
1
asked Was “träumen” ever a reflexive verb?
Nov
29
comment Is “Lass uns uns treffen” correct?
We dodge this bullet in Yiddish by using "sich" for all the reflexives: "lomir sich treffen (=lass wir sich treffen) or even "ich hab' sich die haendt gewascht".
Nov
29
comment How is the equivalent of the English “Let's …” formed?
I'm gratified that you enjoyed it. The "pr" is for "pronounced". (I like to spell Yiddish according to the German system, but that tends to obscure some of the vowel shifts.)
Nov
29
answered How is the equivalent of the English “Let's …” formed?
Nov
29
comment Did German borrow any words from Old Prussian?
I think you understand that I was comparing the pathway Old Prussian => German with the corresponding pathway Lithuanian => Yiddish. What has always baffled me is the disparity between the ease with which we import words from Polish and Ukrainian as compared to the paucity of words from such coterritorial sources as Lithuanian and Hungarian.