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bio website marty-green.blogspot.com
location Canada
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Dec 18 at 0:43

Dec
17
comment Translation of “it all depends on what you believe in”
So you would have downvoted my answer if I had said, "this is how we say it in Bavaria"?
Nov
30
comment Heiliger Abend oder Heiligabend?
Reminds me of the discussion a couple of years ago about the difference between Feinzucker and Feiner Zucker.
Nov
23
comment Übersetzung für “random”
The problem with this question is that it's not a good use of the word "random" even in English. A better way to say it in English would be 'the answer was something of a non-sequitur'.
Nov
23
comment Übersetzung für “random”
When we were growing up we always thought "verfetscht" was perfectly good Yiddish.
Sep
5
comment »wenn ich mich nicht vertue« – origin of »vertue«
Yes, "toes" is the standard transcription, based on the northern or "Litvak" prononciation. In our Polish-Galician tradition it would have been closer to "tuos". Either way, it's definitely from the Hebrew...nothing to do with "tun". The Yiddish "ton" (to do) comes from the German without a doubt.
Jul
1
comment Why does “neu” become “Neues” after “etwas”?
no he isn't......
Jun
29
comment Translation of “it all depends on what you believe in”
Yes it does provide an answer to the question. It offers an alternative phrasing from a particular German dialect. There is nothing improper in the fact that it goes on to ask what other dialects (if any) also use this phrasing.
Jun
20
comment Most terrible-sounding mistakes in German
And I'm a little ashamed to admit that after all these years I still find it pretty funny. Especially after I fixed up the meter.
Jun
20
comment Most terrible-sounding mistakes in German
I couldn't remember the snippet so I looked for it on the internet, and that is what I found. I didn't think they used the umlaut on Goethe but, you don't argue with the Source of All Knowledge.
Jun
19
comment Bifurcation of the “ei” vowel in Yiddish: why?
Nice. I wonder if any other dialects retain some of the same pronunciation patterns as Yiddish?
Jun
10
comment “Ihr” as second person singular
And the "Ihr" usage was retained in Yiddish for second person formal.
Jun
5
comment How to colloquially refer to things written on the blackboard?
Yiddish is as much on topic as any other German dialect.
Jun
2
comment Mein Name ist Hase
Sounds like Sargent Schultz: "I know nusssSINK!". Nice website BTW.
Feb
21
comment Various translations of the English verb “close”
yeah, the prefixes don't always take you in exactly the same direction. For "bequeath", we have "abschreiben", which also works for any transfer of ownership. Oddly enough, if the bailiff comes to confiscate your merchandise, that is also "abschreiben".
Dec
29
comment Obwohl and wenngleich
There is a Bach cantata I learned in choir that goes "obgleich sehr wieder uns die Feinde toben...". Same meaning, right? Also old-fashioned?
Dec
8
comment Is it correct to use “ich sehne mich nach…” for inanimate objects?
We have "benken nach" in Yiddish, which I'm not sure is used German, although I think "bang" is a word. The Yiddish expression seems to work for either a romantic longing or, for example, a longing for home.
Nov
21
comment Was ist ein “Kurverein”?
In Yiddish a kurve is a prostitue (from the Slavic, probably a cognate of "whore") so on quickly reading the passage, I understood that you could learn of the condition of the winter trails by inquiring with the local Union of Prostitutes.
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Can you comment on my question about "die Oeffentlichkeit?"
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
Thanks, Takkat. I found it...what an amazing resource.
Nov
19
comment Do people say “You're just being paranoid” in German?
what happened to the link to the word frequency charts????