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Jun
18
comment Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
For completeness, the scandinavian languages use it as Kingdom too: Rike for kingdom in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian; rikas for wealthy in Finnish (probably from Swedish).
Jun
17
comment Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
But @Takkat interestingly, Leo offers "mächtig" as a translation of the english "rich" so you may be on to something. I don't know.
Jun
17
comment Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
@Takkat still, I don't see the connection. There are contexts where "mächtig" is very close to "reich" - like in your example, or when saying "dieses Programm hat eine mächtige Suchfunktion", which usually means it is very feature-rich - but you can't substitute one word for the other 1:1.
Jun
17
comment Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
@Takkat that doesn't sound right to me - you can't use "mächtig" here, can you? "reich" in that context means "full of", not "powerful"
Jun
17
revised Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
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Jun
17
revised Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
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Jun
17
revised Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
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Jun
17
answered Do the noun 'Reich' and the adjective 'reich' have a common origin?
Jun
17
revised Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
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Jun
17
comment Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
I didn't do military service though - would somebody who did mind confirming that "Jawohl" is still in use in the Bundeswehr? What about Austria and Switzerland?
Jun
17
revised Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
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Jun
17
revised Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
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Jun
17
answered Does “Jawohl” carry Nazi connotations?
Jun
17
awarded  Convention
Jun
16
revised “Schlaf mir nicht ein” - warum “mir”?
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Jun
16
comment Translation of John Doe
@fzwo calling Göring by his full title is nothing like calling Hitler "Führer". Examples from DER SPIEGEL, who are happily using the title: 1978 2003 Whether the answer is factually correct is another question, but I can really see no tastelessness here
Jun
16
comment Translation of John Doe
"Vereinsmeier" is a slightly outdated, but still valid expression, although in my experience, not at all used in the context of "party goer" - it is rather used to describe a person engaged in traditional "organized" social activity ("Sportverein", "Schützenverein")
Jun
16
comment Translation of John Doe
@fzwo why is the quote tasteless? It's a prominent example of the usage of "Meier" in the context of the question. That it was made by one of the most evil persons in German history doesn't really change any of that.
Jun
15
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
14
accepted Was für ein Wort ist “halt”?