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19h
awarded  Yearling
Aug
28
answered Is “Morgen” the same as “Vormittag”?
Aug
27
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
revised Does “Tschüssie” sound a little …weiblich?
Edit to clarify difference between description and proscription
Aug
27
comment Does “Tschüssie” sound a little …weiblich?
@Burki: Valid comment, but while I agree that stereotypes shouldn't be reinforced, just ignoring them doesn't really help... especially if the question specifically asks about gender stereotypes. And of course there aren't any rules how anybody has to express themselves - but I think it's fair to tell a non-native that certain expressions will create a certain impression.
Aug
12
answered How should I say something like “I'm” instead of “I am” in German?
Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
@Em1: While it's the same meaning as always, it actually would be hard for a non-native to understand this sentence due to the missing comma. Again, this is indeed nothing special, since lots of people make comma mistakes. But while both your assertions are true, let's at least try not to give a new member the feeling she's asking a stupid question.
Jul
27
answered Unterschied zwischen „effizient“ und „effektiv“
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
@Chris: Ah, ich beginne zu verstehen :) Ja, im Deutschen ist "Rübe" auch ein botanischer Begriff. Im Englischen heißt sowas je nach Kontext allerdings "root" oder "root vegetable". "Turnip" ist je nach geographischer Lage die Speise- oder die Steckrübe (die verschiedenen Rübenarten sind taxonomisch (sozusagen) ein sumpfiges Feld)... :)
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
@Chris: What's a radish turnip? I've never heard the term before and a quick Google search seems to turn up only pages comparing radishes and turnips...
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
Small correction re: second paragraph: While Rettiche is indeed a branch of the Brassicaceae family, they form a relatively small part. Rape-seed, turnips, cabbages etc. are all not Rettiche!
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@Catomic: It's a matter of nuance. "Wird" is a neutral statement of fact. "Will" is a) poetic, because it sounds archaic; b) to me, it seems to emphasise the gradual approach of evening; c) this process has probably already started, whereas with "wird" all of the described process is in the future.
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@wolfgang: "Es will Abend werden" is archaic use: some people know it from fairy tales or, especially, Luke 24:29 - which is also the title of Bach's cantata BWV 6. See also Adelung's dictionary from 1801 - the 8th definition of "wollen" [zeno.org/Adelung-1793/A/Wollen]
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
Grimm is also interesting in this context: "die eigenbedeutung [i.e. "to want"] von wollen kann weiter zu einem auxiliar verblassen, das in verbindung mit einem inf. temporale oder modale funktion übernimmt, eine entwicklung, die nicht auf das deutsche beschränkt ist, sondern auch an. und besonders ags./engl. für die verbalflexion wichtig wird. ein rest der eigenbedeutung bleibt dem verbum wollen aber in der deutschen sprache immer, auch wo es hilfsverb ist." [emphasis mine] [woerterbuchnetz.de/DWB/…
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
Little comment regarding "das Schiff will sinken" and "es will regnen": Actually, those two would have been correct two hundred years ago (Adelung's dictionary from 1801 mentions the first as an example for his 8th definition of the word [zeno.org/Adelung-1793/A/Wollen]); there's also "es will Abend werden" in Lukas 24:29 - which is the title of Bach's cantata BWV 6.
Jul
15
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
8
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
May
7
revised Who got introduced to whom first in this sentence?
fixed error