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location Bavaria
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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
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38 y/o Bavarian native, translator, master (German M.A.) in English and Art History, used to teach university, worked at a publishers', taught seminars for school students at major museum.


Feb
19
comment What does “vorm” mean?
While the others are right that this is a contraction of "vor dem", note that if (and only if) you put a period after this, it actually is the abbreviation for "vormittags", which means "before noon".
Feb
17
comment Was bedeutet „langsam“ in diesem Kontext?
@c.p., you need to take this with a grain of salt - I'd say that it's primarily context dependent. I use this pretty often - exactly in the "softening" sense you mention in your question. Of course it can also express impatience, but I'm pretty sure you'll be able to tell from the context, e.g. you and your SO are out with friends. "Gehen wir langsam" fits (and will be used) when you're having a great time, but one of you has to get up early next day, and when you're bored stiff and just want to go home.
Feb
14
comment Was ist der richtige Name für „Ohropax“?
This would be a generic(ised) trademark. It's a specialised kind of metonymy.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Hmm, to me, the addition of "mit" turns the phrase into "to turn one's back on sth.", i.e. it hasn't the overtones of "healing" the English closure seems to carry.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Ah, ok - das Problem bei LEO ist, dass viele Einträge situationsbezogen entstehen und nicht nach Häufigkeit gewichtet werden. Da es für "Abwicklung" eine Handvoll Synonyme gibt, ist diese Bedeutung bei LEO extrem überrepräsentiert. Die psychologische closure ist tatsächlich, was hier gemeint ist - mittlerweile ein ziemlich gängiger Begriff.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Grundsätzlich tolle Antwort - das Zitat Deines Kollegen ist klasse! Der dritte Absatz (zu closure) passt allerdings nicht so gut dazu. Speziell der "vorrangige" Buchhalterbezug verwirrt mich ein wenig - das höre ich zum ersten Mal.
Feb
14
answered How do you say “closure”?
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
Alan, perhaps a useful thought: don't confuse the possessive pronoun with the possessive case. Both indicate possession, and accordingly, you use either one or the other to express one level of possession. The only instance when it makes sens to use both is if you have two such levels: Yes, it's her suitcase's lid (the lid that belongs to the suitcase that belongs to her) = ...der Deckel ihres Koffers. As you can see, the possessive pronoun (which beaves as an article here) takes the same case as the noun. But I'd forget about this quickly, because it's such a rare occurrence.
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
@Alan: I'm not sure I understand your comment correctly, but what karoshi is saying is that "these examples contain pronouns, but they aren't in the genitive"
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
@c.p. Apparently our thoughts raced along the same track there for a second: see my comment on the other question... :)
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
@Em1 and c.p.: Sorry, but you're on the wrong track here... If you were talking about a possessive article (possessive adjective for those who prefer that expression) you'd be right: "ihres Buches" is def. genitive. But here we're talking possessive pronoun. Just replace "Buch" with "Koffer" and take a good look at what's happening. :)
Feb
13
comment Possessive pronoun in subject vs. predicate
@stevenvh: isn't the verb together with the predicative the predicate?
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
Careful: there isn't a genitive in these sentences... all there is is a possessive pronoun in the nominative case.
Feb
13
comment Das Possessivpronomen mit Genitiv
You may want to look again - both are "Possessivpronomen" and "ihr" (not "ihres") functions as a "Possessivartikel": canoo.net/services/OnlineGrammar/InflectionRules/FRegeln-P/…
Feb
13
comment Why is »ß« substituted with »ss« rather than »sz«?
@fachexot: Not offended :) But still: assuming that by "tone" you mean "sound" or phoneme, it's actually the same. What's different is the preceding vowel.
Feb
5
comment Der Genitiv französischer Nomen
Die Frage ist super - weil es vielen wohl ähnlich geht. Ich fand auch die beiden Zusätze, die Du inzwischen gelöscht hast, ganz gut. Vielleicht fügst Du die doch wieder ein? :)
Feb
5
comment Der Genitiv französischer Nomen
@Wrzlprmft: Wie gesagt - grundsätzlich richtig, allerdings finde ich einen Hinweis schon wichtig, dass eines der beiden Beispiele, mit denen die Regel verdeutlicht wird, an dieser Stelle unidiomatisch ist. Vielleicht könntest Du zumindest die Wortstellung ändern? (Zu "... auf Cannes' rotem Teppich".) Der nachgestellte Genitiv ist superschräg :)
Feb
5
comment Der Genitiv französischer Nomen
Wrzlprmft + @c.p.: Grundsätzlich richtig - aber das Ende des Beispielsatzes ist ausgesprochen grauenhaft... kein Mensch würde das so sagen. Allenfalls könnte man "Cannes' roten Teppich" schreiben - aber selbst das klingt in meinen Ohren wie eine schlechte Übersetzung. "...auf dem roten Teppich von Cannes" ist hier definitiv die bessere Lösung.
Jan
30
comment What should be a formal greeting when you meet someone in a toilet?
This may well be the best question ever asked here... One little note, however: the "Servus"/"Service" confusion is non-existent. Nobody will even associate the two. Anyway: I don't think there's anything wrong with any of your four options. If you work in an environment where you usually address your boss very formally, it's highly unlikely that you'll be using the same toilet. He'll have his own.
Jan
30
comment Is there a non offensive word for inability?
Excellent points!