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Jul
9
comment Meaning of “Abgechecktheit”
@MichaelBorgwardt: Okay, a bit confused now... none of the three Duden definitions of "abchecken" fits the context here - so the relationship seems to me tentative at best. "Checken" is a much more likely candidate. My point is that non-natives will run a very high risk of not being understood if they use "Abgechecktheit". It complicates things instead of helping communication.
Jul
9
comment Meaning of “Abgechecktheit”
@MichaelBorgwardt: As a native speaker, you're of course free to use this expression. I just don't think it's a good idea not to warn non-natives that it is slang. Since this site is not the German equivalent of urban dictionary but strives to provide useful advice for general usage rather than definitions of newly coined slang expressions, I may have come across a bit judgemental - but I still think it was justified. Also note that googling "Abgechecktheit" exclusively yields links to either this particular interview, comments on it, or this question - not a single other occurrence.
Jul
7
answered Meaning of “Abgechecktheit”
Jun
5
comment Can native German speakers identify each other's dialect even if they are speaking “Hochdeutsch”?
Hmmm, not so sure that fei and gell are "typical for Frankisch" - both are equally common in Upper and Lower Bavaria (pretty sure about the Upper Palatinate, too, although I wouldn't want to bet).
Jun
4
answered Übersetzung für “badger cull”
Jun
4
revised Doubt about a sentence translation and word order
added 330 characters in body
Jun
4
answered Doubt about a sentence translation and word order
May
23
comment Confusion with this ad by DB. Is it possible to omit the verb?
I'm surprised than no one has mentioned so far that the quotation marks are a really bad idea here. They make absolutely no sense and are probably the main reason this example is so confusing, since they can be understood to imply a different speaker for the second phrase.
May
7
comment Kann „Tandem“ als weiblich bzw. männlich betrachtet werden?
Mit dem Edit ist die Frage absolut nachvollziehbar :) Allerdings gibt es hier einen wichtigen Unterschied: "Franziskaner" (Achtung: mit "z") ist in diesem Fall ein Marken-/Eigenname und somit eigentlich nicht mit dem Tandem-Beispiel vergleichbar.
Mar
7
comment Woher kommt “Du daube Nuss”?
+1 für die gewagte (aber m.E. geglückte) Konstruktion um das "Innewohnen" einer Bedeutung herum :)
Mar
6
revised Wann Anführungsstriche, wann kursiv?
Zitat verdeutlicht und korrigiert (letzte Zeile!!!)
Feb
28
comment Is “Ich gehe nach Kartoffeln” correct?
This is an awesome question! Rationally, I'd agree with everybody else that this is wrong, but somehow, I have a gut feeling that it is possible after all - no idea why yet. Perhaps it's the similarity to "nach etw. sehen" or the parallel construction to the English "for". But it does sound idiomatic, if very unusual... I'm stumped. x-files music
Feb
28
comment Noob question about German pronunciation
Can you provide a link to where you're hearing "Heer" pronounced as [hiːɐ̯]? I think that would be really interesting. (Of course, it might just be a case of an over-eager English native speaker who's too confident about his German pronunciation... let's see)
Feb
20
comment Joining related events only with comma
@collapsar: I strongly doubt the "definitely" in your first comment. Most Germans will naturally assume that the speaker is talking about the same day, i.e. that he/she went to the movies last night, precisely because there is only one reference to a particular day.
Feb
19
comment What does “vorm” mean?
While the others are right that this is a contraction of "vor dem", note that if (and only if) you put a period after this, it actually is the abbreviation for "vormittags", which means "before noon".
Feb
17
comment Was bedeutet „langsam“ in diesem Kontext?
@c.p., you need to take this with a grain of salt - I'd say that it's primarily context dependent. I use this pretty often - exactly in the "softening" sense you mention in your question. Of course it can also express impatience, but I'm pretty sure you'll be able to tell from the context, e.g. you and your SO are out with friends. "Gehen wir langsam" fits (and will be used) when you're having a great time, but one of you has to get up early next day, and when you're bored stiff and just want to go home.
Feb
14
comment Was ist der richtige Name für „Ohropax“?
This would be a generic(ised) trademark. It's a specialised kind of metonymy.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Hmm, to me, the addition of "mit" turns the phrase into "to turn one's back on sth.", i.e. it hasn't the overtones of "healing" the English closure seems to carry.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Ah, ok - das Problem bei LEO ist, dass viele Einträge situationsbezogen entstehen und nicht nach Häufigkeit gewichtet werden. Da es für "Abwicklung" eine Handvoll Synonyme gibt, ist diese Bedeutung bei LEO extrem überrepräsentiert. Die psychologische closure ist tatsächlich, was hier gemeint ist - mittlerweile ein ziemlich gängiger Begriff.
Feb
14
comment How do you say “closure”?
Grundsätzlich tolle Antwort - das Zitat Deines Kollegen ist klasse! Der dritte Absatz (zu closure) passt allerdings nicht so gut dazu. Speziell der "vorrangige" Buchhalterbezug verwirrt mich ein wenig - das höre ich zum ersten Mal.