Reputation
5,050
Next tag badge:
72/100 score
14/20 answers
Badges
9 22
Newest
 Necromancer
Impact
~101k people reached

Jul
28
comment Meaning of “ggf.” in this context
@Em1: While it's the same meaning as always, it actually would be hard for a non-native to understand this sentence due to the missing comma. Again, this is indeed nothing special, since lots of people make comma mistakes. But while both your assertions are true, let's at least try not to give a new member the feeling she's asking a stupid question.
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
@Chris: Ah, ich beginne zu verstehen :) Ja, im Deutschen ist "Rübe" auch ein botanischer Begriff. Im Englischen heißt sowas je nach Kontext allerdings "root" oder "root vegetable". "Turnip" ist je nach geographischer Lage die Speise- oder die Steckrübe (die verschiedenen Rübenarten sind taxonomisch (sozusagen) ein sumpfiges Feld)... :)
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
@Chris: What's a radish turnip? I've never heard the term before and a quick Google search seems to turn up only pages comparing radishes and turnips...
Jul
21
comment What is the difference between “der Rettich” and “das Radieschen”?
Small correction re: second paragraph: While Rettiche is indeed a branch of the Brassicaceae family, they form a relatively small part. Rape-seed, turnips, cabbages etc. are all not Rettiche!
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@Catomic: It's a matter of nuance. "Wird" is a neutral statement of fact. "Will" is a) poetic, because it sounds archaic; b) to me, it seems to emphasise the gradual approach of evening; c) this process has probably already started, whereas with "wird" all of the described process is in the future.
Jul
20
comment Can you use “wollen” in Konjunktiv II simply to mean what will happen (no volition)?
@wolfgang: "Es will Abend werden" is archaic use: some people know it from fairy tales or, especially, Luke 24:29 - which is also the title of Bach's cantata BWV 6. See also Adelung's dictionary from 1801 - the 8th definition of "wollen" [zeno.org/Adelung-1793/A/Wollen]
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
Grimm is also interesting in this context: "die eigenbedeutung [i.e. "to want"] von wollen kann weiter zu einem auxiliar verblassen, das in verbindung mit einem inf. temporale oder modale funktion übernimmt, eine entwicklung, die nicht auf das deutsche beschränkt ist, sondern auch an. und besonders ags./engl. für die verbalflexion wichtig wird. ein rest der eigenbedeutung bleibt dem verbum wollen aber in der deutschen sprache immer, auch wo es hilfsverb ist." [emphasis mine] [woerterbuchnetz.de/DWB/…
Jul
20
comment Does “wollen” ever function like English “will” to signal a future event (no volition)
Little comment regarding "das Schiff will sinken" and "es will regnen": Actually, those two would have been correct two hundred years ago (Adelung's dictionary from 1801 mentions the first as an example for his 8th definition of the word [zeno.org/Adelung-1793/A/Wollen]); there's also "es will Abend werden" in Lukas 24:29 - which is the title of Bach's cantata BWV 6.
May
4
comment DW.de-Tweets über „aus Prinzip“ und „im Prinzip“
Vielleicht noch ein Aspekt wäre, dass die Präposition bei "aus Prinzip" eine Begründung impliziert: das Prinzip ist der Grund für das, was im zweiten Satz passiert. Dies ist bei "im Prinzip" nicht der Fall. Hier könnte man noch erwähnen, dass bei dieser Formulierung so gut wie immer ein "aber" folgt - z.B. in Antworten wie "im Prinzip schon, aber".
Apr
13
comment German for “graceful degradation”
Just a small comment: Be very careful with linguee.de... Be aware that it is nothing more than an automated concordance of websites that have an English and a German version. This means that all the entries are just found translations of wildly varying quality. From the context of the entries, it often becomes clear that either the English or the German are atrocious. Linguee should not be treated as a dictionary, but as a confirmation tool of things you already know. For anything else it's pretty much worthless. :(
Mar
4
comment Indicating heritage rather than nationality
@Tony F: This might be a good direction for you to think further about your inscription. Just having the word "Heimat" engraved in the ring could, for example, very well convey the idea you described. It could still be construed along uncomfortably nationalist lines, but as Wrzlprmft says, it is vague enough (especially when worn by an American) not to be offensive in itself. (Always assuming you avoid unfortunate font choices like Fraktur or something... that would change the meaning considerably.)
Mar
4
comment Indicating heritage rather than nationality
[cont.] Please don't take the backlash personally, but be aware that this will be the reaction of the vast majority of Germans - no matter how mild you phrase the inscription, it will always feel to us like a ring stating "I love being white" would feel in the U.S.
Mar
4
comment Indicating heritage rather than nationality
Oh dear, see cultures clash live on SE! Tony, you'll have noticed that your ring is not a good idea in a German context. We are extremely wary of patriotic displays and have reason to be. I'm guessing your reference to "DNA" was not meant as a biological reference, but rather cultural or whatnot - in the same way that companies refer to their DNA in marketing. Unfortunately, to us this reference in the context of nationality immediately reeks of racial ideology, ethnic cleansing and other horrible stuff. [cont.]
Mar
2
comment Is Either “Im Morgen” or “Am Morgen” More Correct in German?
Small suggestion: Maybe you could add a little note that the two Morgen you're talking about are two different words (one m., one n.), i.e. that the difference doesn't lie in the preposition.
Feb
24
comment “So bin ich” vs “Ich auch”
Die Diskussion scheint sich mittlerweile totgelaufen zu haben, trotzdem: @Takkat: ich hab mal über Deinen Einwand nachgedacht - siehe Edit
Feb
13
comment Was ist der Unterschied zwischen “hinreichen” und nur “reichen”?
@Wrzlprmft: Grundsätzlich richtig, dass es technisch möglich ist - allerdings wird so ziemlich jeder deutsche Muttersprachler stutzen und entweder davon ausgehen, dass es sich um einen Fehler handelt, oder etwas Spezielles ausgedrückt werden soll, das nicht von "ausreichend" oder "hinreichend"abgedeckt wird. Gerade im vorliegenden fachsprachlichen Kontext problematisch. Theoretisch mag kein inhaltlicher Unterschied bestehen - in der Praxis funktioniert die Kommunikation im einen Fall wie beabsichtigt, im anderen nicht.
Feb
13
comment How to properly analyze grossly incoherent colloquial constructs?
About the use of "war": I'd say that it serves a particular purpose in German - often unconsciously, but still very idiomatic. It implies that the speaker isn't asking for new information but a reminder. The speaker is stating that he knew the info at some point, but isn't sure anymore (or has forgotten altogether). Whether being perceived as forgetful is in fact preferable to appearing uninformed in the first place is open to debate, of course. :)
Feb
6
comment Argument- Pro oder Contra
@closers: Eindeutig eine sprachliche Frage - es geht um den Bezug. @ Mary: Du hättest Recht, wenn nur der Satz vor dem Gedankenstrich dastehen würde. Durch den Zusatz "das ist ungerecht" wird das Ganze zum Pro-Argument. Umformuliert: "Weil es ungerecht ist, dass jeder das Recht auf ein Spenderorgan hat, egal ob selber Spender oder nicht, sollte auch jeder Organspender werden." (Nicht das beste Argument, das ich je gehört habe, aber ok...)
Jan
14
comment Difference between “das Klima” and “das Wetter”
It's not precisely an answer to your question, but since it's the same in English, here's a rather cute explanation of the difference: youtube.com/watch?v=cBdxDFpDp_k -
Dec
2
comment “Bild” zu “visualisiert” ist wie “Ton” zu…?
@schlingel: Was lange währt, wird endlich gut :) Vielen Dank für das Update!