253 reputation
15
bio website
location Potsdam, Germany
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jul 17 at 5:55

Sep
19
comment Is there a rule which preposition to use for a place?
"The use of an […] when you want to go to some kind of border." I try to explain a little differently: "an" can has the meaning of going to a point that's just nearby the referred place, not the place exactly. The different meaning of "An die Arbeit gehen." becomes explicit, if you change the word order: "die Arbeit angehen" – meaning "to go about doing sth."/"to approach". "Zu is when your goal is a building." …or a person (Ich gehe zu Laura).
Sep
19
comment What is a good translation of “Rüstzeit”?
I never heard that word in German before. Seems to be more a dialect, see also: bar.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rüsten_(Fertigungstechnik). BTW: @Gigili why is this question tagged with two tags, meaning the same?
Sep
19
awarded  Critic
Sep
19
comment “Redirect an address to a server” - which preposition should I use?
In which dictionary did you read that?
Sep
19
comment “Redirect an address to a server” - which preposition should I use?
@Joachim I don't know where you've ever heard "umbiegen" in that context, but it has a completely different meaning (as of "to bend sth." or [also] "to turn around"). You just can't bend digital information, so I agree with Hendrik, that the usage of "umbiegen" is quite strange in that context, especially for a German speaker. Nonetheless +1 for providing the correct answer afterwards. LEO also mentions "umschalten" as a technical term, but thats unusual for domain-redirects too, it's more usable for signal-shifting in general.
Sep
18
revised Writing a time interval in abbreviated form
added 2 characters in body
Sep
18
comment Writing a time interval in abbreviated form
@Gigili Why are you editing the time-example as a blockquote? I'm not quoting anyone here. If you like to embed the example in a specific tag, you should use <code> (represented in Markdow by backticks or indentation by four spaces or one tab). This is against anything I've ever learned about HTML semantics… (Even better would be the HTML5 <samp>-tag, but that isn't allowed on the SE-network.)
Sep
16
awarded  Teacher
Sep
16
answered Writing a time interval in abbreviated form
Sep
16
comment Gibt es Rotwelsch mittlerweile auch in der gehobenen Sprache?
Mit deinen Beispielen hast du deine Frage ja schon nahezu beantwortet. Bei Wörtern wie Blagen, Kabuff oder schmusen war mir die derartige Herkunft nicht bewusst. Das ist die Sprache meiner Großeltern…
Sep
16
awarded  Editor
Sep
16
comment Ist 'humanitäre Katastrophe' eine sprachliche Katastrophe?
@Ray Ich habe den emotionalen Satz wieder raus genommen. Anscheinend wird zumindest "humanitarian catastrophe" auch von Amnesty International genutzt…
Sep
16
revised Ist 'humanitäre Katastrophe' eine sprachliche Katastrophe?
deleted 118 characters in body
Sep
16
answered Ist 'humanitäre Katastrophe' eine sprachliche Katastrophe?
Sep
15
comment What's a good translation for “outcome measures”?
+1 for "Ergebnis(se)", which may be specified further
Sep
15
comment Wonach richtet sich das Geschlecht eines Anglizismus?
@Hinek Zu der Zeit als die meisten Automarken benannt wurden, war (Motoren-)Wagen durchaus üblicher als der eher moderne Auto(-mobil).
Sep
15
comment Welche Eselsbrücken gibt es, um “dass” und “das” auseinander zu halten?
Die eigentliche Eselsbrücke ist wohl der Hinweis auf die Ersetzung durch welches/dieses/jenes. »Ich wusste doch, dass es jenes Das ist, welches man mit zwei "s" schreibt.«
Sep
15
comment die Rechtstruktur in den/dem Katalog einbauen?
Bei "Rechtstruktur in den Katalog einbauen" habe ich zuerst an eine Rechteverwaltung in einer Software gedacht – insofern kann auch ein technisches Wort passend sein, aber wie du sagtest, kommt das auf Kontext an.
Sep
15
comment die Rechtstruktur in den/dem Katalog einbauen?
"im Katalog einbauen" can has a different meaning then "in den Katalog", depending on the context; so better to use the more clear "in den"…
Sep
14
comment Is “thou” the English equivalent of “Sie”?
What I see here is a sound shift. early Old High German thou/thu → classical OHG dū, du (English thou, Icelandic þú : Low German dü, German du)