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1940
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location Hessen / Baden-Württemberg
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Computational Linguist


Oct
29
answered When to use “noch nie” vs “noch nicht” vs “nie”?
Oct
29
comment When to use “noch nie” vs “noch nicht” vs “nie”?
Yes, c.p., that's correct.
Oct
28
comment Rules for “es geht um”
In 2), the proper names are in the dative case, as becomes apparent when they are replaced by pronouns: "Ihr geht es um die Fortführung...", "Ihm geht es um ..."
Oct
4
answered “Unterwegs” or “auf dem Weg”?
Sep
30
comment Why “Bitteschön”?
"Pretty please".
Sep
24
reviewed Reject suggested edit on “Hang out with friends” in German
Sep
23
comment “Das Buch wird immer zu uns gehören”
Yes, @karoshi. It's the much simpler statement of the two. "Das Buch wird immer uns gehören" -- "The book will always be ours".
Sep
19
comment 'Schau sie dir doch an'
Another difficulty might be the fact that "sich anschauen" is reflexive and requires a dative reflexive pronoun. "Schau", "dir" and "an" are all parts of "look at".
Sep
16
answered “Das ist kein Thema” - What does it mean?
Sep
15
awarded  Yearling
Sep
13
answered is “wie geschnitten Brot” grammatically correct?
Sep
11
answered Correct building of a double subordinate clause with impersonal construct
Sep
11
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
11
comment When to use “der/die/das” instead of “er/sie/es”?
Interesting question. My first instinct was to say "Spoken German often substitutes personal pronouns for definite articles." I'm still sure it happens at times, but it does seem to follow a pattern. "Hast Du Petra gesehen?" - "Die war eben noch da". But: "Ich hab mit Petra gesprochen." - "Was hat sie gesagt?" Note that this is colloquial style; in written (or very correctly spoken) German you'd definitely use the personal pronoun.
Sep
10
comment Ist falsches Deutsch wie hier wirklich einfacher?
Die eigentliche Frage bezieht sich aber nicht auf die klar formulierten Aussagen, sondern auf die Abweichungen von grammatikalischem und orthografischem Regelwerk.
Sep
9
revised What word did the Germans use for “Buchstabe” before print was invented?
fixed a typo
Sep
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
6
reviewed Approve suggested edit on 4711, 08/15 and other numbers with some flair in German?
Sep
6
answered What word did the Germans use for “Buchstabe” before print was invented?
Sep
5
answered “Every two years” auf Deutsch