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May
4
comment Endung “für den Autopilot” oder “den Autopiloten”
Aber @TaW: Wie ist es mit dem Akk.Sg.: "Ich esse gerne falschen Hase"? schauder
Mar
25
comment How to say “Class of” in German?
"Abijahrgang 2019", where appropriate.
Mar
12
comment “Gehören” mit Akkusativ oder Dativ?
@TaW Da sieht man aber keinen Kasus. ;)
Jan
30
comment How do you say “I was driving when it happened.” seeing as German has no Progressive Tense?
A closer and more accurate translation could be "Ich saß gerade am Steuer...", but anyway, +1 for "gerade", which is the crucial element in conveying the progressive meaning.
Oct
8
comment Ausdruck “historisch gewachsen” auf Englisch?
You translation means something entirely different. "Historisch gewachsen" means that something is the way it is because of the history of its creation and modifications. It might look different if it had from the start been designed to fulfill the purpose it is fulfilling now.
Oct
2
comment Unterschied: Nummer vs. Zahl
Belege dafür finden sich z.B. auch in Komposita: Hausnummer, Schadensnummer (bei der Versicherung), Rechnungsnummer, Autonummer... da wäre jeweils -zahl nicht möglich.
Sep
4
comment Which German films to watch to improve my German?
@Ichbinmich No, I mean buy (or rent) a set of DVDs with, for instance, the German version of a season of "The Simpsons" on it, and watch that with varying subtitles.
Sep
3
comment Which German films to watch to improve my German?
What about English-language series that hvae been dubbed in German? Just buy the German DVD (mind the region code) and that will usually have audio and subtitles in both English and German. Series have the advantage that you can go through the episodes one by one and don't have to sit through 6h for your three runs.
Aug
8
comment Literal meaning of: “Es ist noch kein Meister vom Himmel gefallen”
Thanks for your input, @Emanuel!
Aug
7
comment Literal meaning of: “Es ist noch kein Meister vom Himmel gefallen”
@Emanuel I guess you're right. I've always found analysis of expletives confusing. Would you agree to call it similar?
Jul
11
comment Where to read German essays online?
hausarbeiten.de ?
Jun
10
comment Präposition für fliegen
Related: german.stackexchange.com/questions/12078/…
Jun
10
comment Präposition für fliegen
Almost: You'd also say "Ich fliege ins Vereinigte Königreich", which is neuter. You use "nach" for countries that are used without an article in German.
Jun
10
comment Wann Drache und wann Drachen?
@Milchgesicht in the derivations, the n is a "Fugenelement". (de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugenelement)
Jun
10
comment “Unterwegs” or “auf dem Weg”?
Downvotes without comments are rude. :(
Jun
6
comment How to use the verb “pflegen” with the meaning of - being used to do something?
This meaning of "pflegen" isn't used much anymore. If you want to use it anyway, look at Ingmar's answer, otherwise just say "Meine Oma macht jeden Tag ein Mittagsschläfchen."
Jun
5
comment Can native German speakers identify each other's dialect even if they are speaking “Hochdeutsch”?
Yes, @Zane, if they know the differences in the first place. I'm sure speakers from Emden, Hamburg and Greifswald are easily told apart by north Germans, but I for one wouldn't be able to, simply because I don't know what to listen for.
Jun
5
comment Zugehörigkeit ausdrücken ohne »von«
+1 für "bedürfen" mit Genitivobjekt!
Jun
4
comment Can native German speakers identify each other's dialect even if they are speaking “Hochdeutsch”?
Also, if your parents or grandparents have at some point moved to a different region with a different dialect, they might choose to speak Hochdeutsch at home, so this is what their kids learn. And pass on to their kids in return. This is how I grew up speaking Hochdeutsch. Come to think of it, many kids im my school were raised speking Hochdeutsch although their parents speak the local dialect.
Jun
4
comment How to include an English word in a German sentence?
DO NOT write "Cloud Anbieter". German compounds are written either in one word or with a hyphen, but NEVER EVER with a Deppenleerzeichen. That would be a spelling mistake.