662 reputation
38
bio website quantenbrot.tumblr.com
location Germany
age 22
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Feb 13 at 9:13

This is fun.


Jul
21
comment How is the prefix “uber-” differently used in German vs. English?
@Ladybug: If you wrote that comment as an answer and elaborated a few bits I'd say it's a pretty acceptable answer.
Jul
1
comment Does the German language have a Shakespeare?
+1 for Goethe. My former German teacher could not emphasize enough how utterly importan Goethe was to the German language and cultural development. Plus, when I read the questions, Goethe was the first writer to pop in my head alongside with Faust.
Jun
14
comment Was für ein Wort ist “Ei”/“Ai”?
Ah, stimmt, das kommt auch der Verwendung in meiner Region sehr Nahe. Ich hätte vielleicht lieber den Haken hier gesetzt :/
Jun
11
comment Simple but interesting German literature
+1 for Kafka. His stories are great, they're easy to understand as far as language is concerned, but the meaning/intention is a whole other story.
Jun
3
comment Wann und warum ging das Beugen von Namen verloren?
Hast du Beispiele dafür?
Jun
2
comment Wie übersetzt man “schwerpunktmäßig” ins Englische?
Ich würde es vielleicht mit "primarily" ansetzen/ergänzen, um den Schwerpunktcharakter zu betonen.
May
26
comment Ist ein Buchstabe eine Nummer?
Kenne ich nur von Kandidaten bei "Wer Wird Millionär", die "Nummer 1" meinen, "A" lesen und dann "Nummer A" sagen :)
May
25
comment Was sind gute Zungenbrecher im Deutschen? / What are good German tongue-twisters?
I thought this was only used to depress French people :)
May
25
comment Eifersucht vs. Neid
But I think you should make a difference between standard high german and regional differences / dialect. In 19 years in Germany I never heard "neidig" and would be confused if someone used it, hence my need for clarification.
May
25
comment Why no perfect participle? “Sie hat sich scheiden lassen”
@Tim at this point it comes back to the passive/active concept. "Sich scheiden lassen" is a passive action, "sich trennen" is an active action, both rely on different rules when it comes to past tense.
May
25
comment What do we have to take care of when trying to learn grammar from spoken conversations?
@teylyn: it depends on who you speak to, the acceptance for local dialect may vary for example between different age groups. In general, I suggest to be quite careful when it comes to local dialects.
May
25
comment Why no perfect participle? “Sie hat sich scheiden lassen”
@Tim: "sich von jemandem trennen" is similiar to "sich scheiden lassen", but it does not equal "divorce", it's just "to break up". As far as grammar is concerned, thei's and RegDwight's answers are more accurate, sorry for that.
May
24
comment What do we have to take care of when trying to learn grammar from spoken conversations?
@Takkat: Yep, and you gotta start at some point :) Understanding the oddities helps understanding the regularities.
May
24
comment What do we have to take care of when trying to learn grammar from spoken conversations?
I know people from Baden-Württemberg and I'm from Hesse. I can assure you, there are pretty extreme dialects around these regions as well :) The south has its "schwäbisch"/"badisch" and Hesse got this pretty strong dialect which is most common in the area around Frankfurt/Main.
May
24
comment Selbständig vs. selbstständig
@Tim that may be due to reduction of redundancies, similiar to compund words which would require three consequent identical consonants. This one is a compound of "selbst" and "ständig", hence the double "st".
May
24
comment What are the differences in punctuation between German and English?
Are you sure about this? I didn't learn that in school.