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Mar
6
revised Can “Kristall” mean “broken glass”?
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Mar
5
revised Can “Kristall” mean “broken glass”?
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Mar
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awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
5
revised Can “Kristall” mean “broken glass”?
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Mar
4
revised Can “Kristall” mean “broken glass”?
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Mar
4
answered Can “Kristall” mean “broken glass”?
Sep
14
comment Recording numbers in the German language
I would daresy the 34,8000 is just plain wrong. ;-)
Mar
17
comment Asking ethnicity in German?
@Raphael: Where did you grow up? Where have you studied? Have you experienced other cultures? All valid questions, and as you might note, none of them touches on the ethnicity of the interviewee, which was my point.
Mar
17
comment Asking ethnicity in German?
@peterh: Well, there's a whole world of difference between asking someone where he has lived before, or what the reason for his strange accent might be -- and asking for ethinicity in specific. The first two might be interesting, even important to know depending on context. But ethnicity should never, ever matter in any way, so it can make for a casual topic between good acquaintances, but a very touchy one in any other context. (Doubly so in Germany, I agree with you on that.)
Mar
17
comment Asking ethnicity in German?
@Raphael: That very much depends on circumstances. If you're already on friendly terms with someone, you can ask him about ethinicity, no problem. But at a job interview? Definite no-go.
Mar
17
comment Asking ethnicity in German?
@RedSonja: Seconding the "Sie". "Du" always needs to be offered (personally), set (by company policy), or really obviously safe to assume -- and the latter can be tricky. A LAN party would be safe "du" terrain, but a software symposium could be not, depending. If in any doubt, always play it safe and start with "Sie".
Jan
8
comment Problem differentiating between [i:] and [e:]
There are areas in Germany (Ostwestfalen...) where the sentence "Der Maler hat Farbe am Arm" would be pronounced without a single discernable "r" unless the speaker really pays attention. ;-)
May
12
comment Why and when is the comparative degree used to express the opposite?
@PsiX: Note that this is true only when used outside of an actual comparison. "Das ist ein älteres Auto" means a somewhat older, but not "really" old car, when it's the only car you are looking at. "Dieses ist das ältere Auto", when looking at two cars side-by-side, does indicate that this is older than the other. Tricky, I (native German) never reflected on this...
Sep
28
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Jun
14
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Jun
14
comment Does pronunciation of German words vary a lot across different places in Germany?
@userunknown: Da sieht man mal, was einen das Fernsehen verblödet. :-D
Jun
14
comment Does pronunciation of German words vary a lot across different places in Germany?
@Em1: Nein, durchaus nicht. Diese Begriffe kommen zum Großteil aus den regionalen "Platt"-Mundarten (Niederdeutsch), und die sind tatsächlich dabei auszusterben. Diverse Begriffe haben sich aber in den allgemeinen Sprachgebrauch eingefügt, und sind durchaus auch bei jüngeren Generationen im Gebrauch. ("Kolter" haben wir von unserer 20-jährigen Nachbarin in Hessen gelernt. ;-) ) Bei manchen Begriffen sind sich vor allem die Jugendlichen nicht einmal bewußt, das sie überregional unüblich sind. Die komischen Blicke, die wir von besagter Nachbarin für "Pölter" geerntet haben, waren klasse. :-D
Jun
13
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Jun
13
awarded  Editor
Jun
13
revised Does pronunciation of German words vary a lot across different places in Germany?
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