3 added 147 characters in body
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I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

PS I have just studied a Low German and Dutch dictionary and did not find Törn. So the view that Törn was borrowed from English must be right. The English word from French tourner. And I found that there is already a Latin word tornus a potter's wheel and Greek tórnos meaning the same.

I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

PS I have just studied a Low German and Dutch dictionary and did not find Törn. So the view that Törn was borrowed from English must be right.

I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

PS I have just studied a Low German and Dutch dictionary and did not find Törn. So the view that Törn was borrowed from English must be right. The English word from French tourner. And I found that there is already a Latin word tornus a potter's wheel and Greek tórnos meaning the same.

2 added 147 characters in body
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I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

PS I have just studied a Low German and Dutch dictionary and did not find Törn. So the view that Törn was borrowed from English must be right.

I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.

PS I have just studied a Low German and Dutch dictionary and did not find Törn. So the view that Törn was borrowed from English must be right.

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I assume that someone who undertakes a trip with his sailing boat has to turn after some time to get home again. It is not absolutely necessary that Segeltörn is borrowed from English as the people living on the border of the North Sea in Germany and the Netherlands have a lot of marine terms in common with English. So I am not astonished about the spelling Törn. There are a lot of words German and English have in common (ship, boat, sea, water, sail etc) and nobody would say one language has borrowed from the other. They have been in common since earliest times. English to turn and Low German Törn are nothing but a variant of German drehen, mostly pronounced /dre:n/. If you place r after the vowel you get /*dern/ (the asterisk means I assume this form hypothetically). /*dern/ would easily become Törn or English turn. So one might say German drehen, Törn, and English turn have historically the same source. - The letter r easily changes its position before or after a vowel. That is a very frequent phenomenon of r, compare German Brett and English board, German ihre Brüste and Dutch haar borsten, German Brunnen and German Born, German brennen and English burn.