3 added 7 characters in body
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If you go for the gramaticallygrammatically correct version, use "die Studenten". That's the generic masculinummasculine form.

But: overOver the last few decades, there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd, you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswellas well like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamersmainstreamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanistsGermanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressedaddressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in".

If you go for the gramatically correct version use "die Studenten". That's the generic masculinum form.

But: over the last few decades there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswell like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in"

If you go for the grammatically correct version, use "die Studenten". That's the generic masculine form.

But: Over the last few decades, there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd, you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that as well like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainstreamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. Germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are addressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in".

2 added 1 character in body
source | link

If you go for the gramatically correct version use "die Studenten". That"That's the generic masculinum form.

But: over the last few decades there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswell like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in"

If you go for the gramatically correct version use "die Studenten". That" the generic masculinum form.

But: over the last few decades there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswell like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in"

If you go for the gramatically correct version use "die Studenten". That's the generic masculinum form.

But: over the last few decades there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswell like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in"

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source | link

If you go for the gramatically correct version use "die Studenten". That" the generic masculinum form.

But: over the last few decades there have been some people (mainly feminists / gender mainstreamers) who felt excluded by that use, so they invented quite a few ways to overcome that. If you speak to a crowd you can't go wrong with "Studentinnen und Studenten" (you usually have to use the female version first). When writing you can use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Studenten/-innen" or something like that.

There are stronger forms of that aswell like e.g. StudentInnen (this form is called Binnen-I), Student_Innen or Student*innen. While the Binnen-I is rather generally accepted the latter ones are not. All these forms are often used by liberals / feminists / gender mainsteamers / etc. while they are much disliked by most conservatives and people who know a lot about the language (e.g. germanists).

There is even a very left-leaning university in Germany that went as far as to stop using the male version at all, so male students are adressed as "Studentinnen".

It is a very politically charged subject.

So if you do not want to take any specific political position, use "Studentinnen und Studenten" or "Student/-in"