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Taking a rather very naïve approach:

Here is the Google-Ngram for there is/are in English:

Ngram for “There is” in EnglishNgram for “There is/are” in English

And here is the same one for es gibt in German:

Ngram for “Es gibt” in German

Assuming that the Ngrams reflect the actual speech, there is/are is used about 50 % morethree times as often at the very beginning of the sentence than es gibt. Something similar holds for cases where there is some introductory adverbial or similar as in:

In my opinion, there is nothing on TV.
Meiner Meinung nach gibt es nichts im Fersehen.

So as long as we only look at there is/are and es gibt at the beginning of the sentence or similar, there isthe former is used more often. (If we also want to take into account subclauses, it gets more complicated, because of sentences like “Ich bin der Meinung, dass es heute nichts im Fersehen gibt.“)

Taking a rather very naïve approach:

Here is the Google-Ngram for there is in English:

Ngram for “There is” in English

And here is the same one for es gibt in German:

Ngram for “Es gibt” in German

Assuming that the Ngrams reflect the actual speech, there is is used about 50 % more often at the very beginning of the sentence than es gibt. Something similar holds for cases where there is some introductory adverbial or similar as in:

In my opinion, there is nothing on TV.
Meiner Meinung nach gibt es nichts im Fersehen.

So as long as we only look at there is and es gibt at the beginning of the sentence or similar, there is is used more often. (If we also want to take into account subclauses, it gets more complicated, because of sentences like “Ich bin der Meinung, dass es heute nichts im Fersehen gibt.“)

Taking a rather very naïve approach:

Here is the Google-Ngram for there is/are in English:

Ngram for “There is/are” in English

And here is the same one for es gibt in German:

Ngram for “Es gibt” in German

Assuming that the Ngrams reflect the actual speech, there is/are is used about three times as often at the very beginning of the sentence than es gibt. Something similar holds for cases where there is some introductory adverbial or similar as in:

In my opinion, there is nothing on TV.
Meiner Meinung nach gibt es nichts im Fersehen.

So as long as we only look at there is/are and es gibt at the beginning of the sentence or similar, the former is used more often. (If we also want to take into account subclauses, it gets more complicated, because of sentences like “Ich bin der Meinung, dass es heute nichts im Fersehen gibt.“)

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Taking a rather very naïve approach:

Here is the Google-Ngram for there is in English:

Ngram for “There is” in English

And here is the same one for es gibt in German:

Ngram for “Es gibt” in German

Assuming that the Ngrams reflect the actual speech, there is is used about 50 % more often at the very beginning of the sentence than es gibt. Something similar holds for cases where there is some introductory adverbial or similar as in:

In my opinion, there is nothing on TV.
Meiner Meinung nach gibt es nichts im Fersehen.

So as long as we only look at there is and es gibt at the beginning of the sentence or similar, there is is used more often. (If we also want to take into account subclauses, it gets more complicated, because of sentences like “Ich bin der Meinung, dass es heute nichts im Fersehen gibt.“)