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I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is onlynever used for Nominativ, when the gendertarget is neutrala person. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female worda person, and the solution presents itself (because if the gender isn't neutralit's a person, you will neveralways ask "Was"Wer?" for the Nominativ and "Wen?" for Akkusativ).

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is only used for Nominativ, when the gender is neutral. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female word, and the solution presents itself (because if the gender isn't neutral, you will never ask "Was?" for the Nominativ).

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is never used for Nominativ, when the target is a person. So just make it a habit to replace the target with a person, and the solution presents itself (because if it's a person, you will always ask "Wer?" for Nominativ and "Wen?" for Akkusativ).

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

2 added 83 characters in body
source | link

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is only used for Nominativ, when the gender is neutral. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female word, and the solution presents itself (because if the gender isn't neutral, you will never ask "Was?" for the Nominativ).

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is only used for Nominativ, when the gender is neutral. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female word, and the solution presents itself.

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is only used for Nominativ, when the gender is neutral. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female word, and the solution presents itself (because if the gender isn't neutral, you will never ask "Was?" for the Nominativ).

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.

1
source | link

I can only tell you the way we learnt it (as native speakers) in our first years of school:

Nominativ (1. Fall) - Ask "Wer?" (oder "Was?")

  • z. B. "Peter hat den Kuchen gemacht." -> "Wer hat den Kuchen gemacht?" -> "Peter."
  • oder "Der CO2-Ausstoß hat globale Konsequenzen." -> "Was hat globale Konsequenzen?" -> "Der CO2-Ausstoß."

Genitiv (2. Fall) - Ask "Wessen?"

  • z. B. "Das war die Geschichte deines Bruders." -> "Wessen Geschichte war das?" -> "Die deines Bruders."

Dativ (3. Fall) - Ask "Wem?"

  • "Das Buch gehört doch deiner Freundin." -> "Wem gehört das Buch?" -> "Deiner Freundin."

Akkusativ (4. Fall) - Ask "Wen?" (oder "Was?")

  • "Der Direktor hat Tanja geschimpft." -> "Wen hat der Direktor geschimpft?" -> "Tanja."
  • "Bernhard hat den Bildschirm kaputt gemacht." -> "Was hat Bernhard kaputt gemacht?" -> "Den Bildschirm."

This solution works for every sentence in the German language I've ever come across. For me, the biggest complication was to decide, if it's Nominativ or Akkusativ: It's ambiguos, if the question is "Was?" - but the solution is: "Was?" is only used for Nominativ, when the gender is neutral. So just make it a habit to replace the target with any male/female word, and the solution presents itself.

BTW, I will never forget, that we had to colour all the words in countless pages with this code: Nomitativ=red, Genitiv=blue, Dativ=green, Akkusativ=yellow.