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This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874Warum „anderen“ anstatt „anderem“?

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

This question also has an answer here (in German):
Warum „anderen“ anstatt „anderem“?

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

4 replaced http://meta.german.stackexchange.com/ with https://german.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this postthis post on Meta.

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

3 Link auf die deutsche Variante
source | link

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

This question also has an answer here (in German):
http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/33874

Adjective endings in German seem inconsistent, even if one is aware that adjective endings depend on case, gender and number.

For example:

Ein roter Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der rote Apfel liegt auf dem Tisch.
Der Apfel ist rot.

In all three sentences, the same adjective (rot) describes the same noun (Apfel), which has the same case (nominative). Still, the adjective has different endings.

How is this phenomenon called and what are the rules behind it?


This is an attempt to create a canonical question to serve as duplicate for all similar questions. Answers should therefore not only focus on the example but be capable to address all similar questions. For further details, see this post on Meta.

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