4 Removed “random add-on question”
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I understand "..der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

EDIT: The question is, how is it that both "ich" and "der Zug" are both the subject of this sentence

Random add-on question: What's up with "sag mir" Why isn't it sagt mir?

I understand "..der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

EDIT: The question is, how is it that both "ich" and "der Zug" are both the subject of this sentence

Random add-on question: What's up with "sag mir" Why isn't it sagt mir?

I understand "..der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

EDIT: The question is, how is it that both "ich" and "der Zug" are both the subject of this sentence

3 added 179 characters in body; edited title
source | link

I understand "...der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this, so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

EDIT: The question is, how is it that both "ich" and "der Zug" are both the subject of this sentence

Random add-on question: What's up with "sag mir" Why isn't it sagt mir?

I understand "...der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this, so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

I understand "..der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

EDIT: The question is, how is it that both "ich" and "der Zug" are both the subject of this sentence

Random add-on question: What's up with "sag mir" Why isn't it sagt mir?

2 added 1 character in body; edited title
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"Ich weiß nicht, wann der Zug abfährt" Why is "der Zug" not Accusativeaccusative?

I understand "...der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this, so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?  

"Ich weiß nicht, wann der Zug abfährt" Why is "der Zug" not Accusative?

I understand "..der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?  

"Ich weiß nicht, wann der Zug abfährt" Why is "der Zug" not accusative?

I understand "...der Zug abfährt" is an independent clause so it makes sense that it would have its own subject. I would just like to know the name of the rule/sentence structure that allows for/explains this, so I can Google a long form explanation of it. Something about interrogative particles?

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