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The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in your second example to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. Instead, I would propose the following for ‘I find that it’s more difficult to do that now’:

Ich stelle fest, dass es jetzt schwerer ist, das zu tun. → Ich stelle das fest.

And for ‘I found that we had little in common’:

Ich habe gemerkt, dass wir wenig gemein haben. → Ich habe das gemerkt.[1]

But if context is clear enough, you can use the verb finden as intended by you:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)


[1]: Please credit Danni’s answerDanni’s answer for the word choice here.

The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in your second example to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. Instead, I would propose the following for ‘I find that it’s more difficult to do that now’:

Ich stelle fest, dass es jetzt schwerer ist, das zu tun. → Ich stelle das fest.

And for ‘I found that we had little in common’:

Ich habe gemerkt, dass wir wenig gemein haben. → Ich habe das gemerkt.[1]

But if context is clear enough, you can use the verb finden as intended by you:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)


[1]: Please credit Danni’s answer for the word choice here.

The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in your second example to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. Instead, I would propose the following for ‘I find that it’s more difficult to do that now’:

Ich stelle fest, dass es jetzt schwerer ist, das zu tun. → Ich stelle das fest.

And for ‘I found that we had little in common’:

Ich habe gemerkt, dass wir wenig gemein haben. → Ich habe das gemerkt.[1]

But if context is clear enough, you can use the verb finden as intended by you:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)


[1]: Please credit Danni’s answer for the word choice here.

2 added 495 characters in body
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The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in that meaningyour second example to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. Instead, I would propose the following for ‘I find that it’s more difficult to do that now’:

Ich stelle fest, dass es jetzt schwerer ist, das zu tun. → Ich stelle das fest.

And for ‘I found that we had little in common’:

Ich habe gemerkt, dass wir wenig gemein haben. → Ich habe das gemerkt.[1]

But if context is clear enough, you can use itthe verb finden as intended by you:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)


[1]: Please credit Danni’s answer for the word choice here.

The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in that meaning to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. But if context is clear enough, you can use it:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)

The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in your second example to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. Instead, I would propose the following for ‘I find that it’s more difficult to do that now’:

Ich stelle fest, dass es jetzt schwerer ist, das zu tun. → Ich stelle das fest.

And for ‘I found that we had little in common’:

Ich habe gemerkt, dass wir wenig gemein haben. → Ich habe das gemerkt.[1]

But if context is clear enough, you can use the verb finden as intended by you:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)


[1]: Please credit Danni’s answer for the word choice here.

1
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The question boils down to which verbal expression you’re using. Denken has two possible extensions: etwas denken or an etwas denken. With demonstrative pronouns, these two expressions become:

Ich habe das gedacht.

or

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Etwas denken translates pretty well to to think something, where something is typically a subordinate clause of some sort. Like in your first example sentence which would translate to:

Ich habe gedacht, dass es in der Stadtmitte einen Zoo gibt.

An etwas denken typically translates to to think about something, typically a noun. So you could build a sentence:

Ich habe an den Zoo gedacht.

Your question obviously asks for the first of these two constructions. If you transform the subordinate clause into a pronoun, that pronoun has to become a simple das.

Ich habe das gedacht.

If you want to replace an den Zoo from the second sentence by a pronoun, that one needs to be daran — or an das in very informal, colloquial usage. Stick with daran, though.

Ich habe daran gedacht.

Idiomacity is a bit tricky in this case, since thinking about something is so much more common than merely thinking something. Hence why somebody probably thought you wanted to say the other thing. But if you were referring to a thought as present in a subordinate clause, it has to be das, no other options.


The same thing is true about finden, except that there is no *an etwas finden, and that the figurative meaning of the verb overlaps with the literal one. As such, I would deem a sentence with finden in that meaning to be not quite as idiomatic, since the second meaning can unintentionally shine through. But if context is clear enough, you can use it:

A: Ich finde, dass dein Chef ein netter Mensch ist.

B: Das finde ich auch.
(Word order changed from ‘Ich finde das auch’, because this emphasised version sounds more natural here.)