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Is it more natural (or easier) to say:

... , wenn zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range sich einen Eheschwur leisten!?

rather than:

... , wenn sich zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range einen Eheschwur leisten!?


I have already referred to some enlightening past posts, notably this onethis one, but there still remains one point that I hope to clarify.

When a subordinate clause is relatively long and you place sich immediately after a conjunction, it does not seem easy to keep track of the relation between sich and the verb leisten placed at the end.

As a non-native speaker, I'm more inclined to put sich closer to leisten, but how do native speakers think about this?

Is it more natural (or easier) to say:

... , wenn zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range sich einen Eheschwur leisten!?

rather than:

... , wenn sich zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range einen Eheschwur leisten!?


I have already referred to some enlightening past posts, notably this one, but there still remains one point that I hope to clarify.

When a subordinate clause is relatively long and you place sich immediately after a conjunction, it does not seem easy to keep track of the relation between sich and the verb leisten placed at the end.

As a non-native speaker, I'm more inclined to put sich closer to leisten, but how do native speakers think about this?

Is it more natural (or easier) to say:

... , wenn zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range sich einen Eheschwur leisten!?

rather than:

... , wenn sich zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range einen Eheschwur leisten!?


I have already referred to some enlightening past posts, notably this one, but there still remains one point that I hope to clarify.

When a subordinate clause is relatively long and you place sich immediately after a conjunction, it does not seem easy to keep track of the relation between sich and the verb leisten placed at the end.

As a non-native speaker, I'm more inclined to put sich closer to leisten, but how do native speakers think about this?

2 edited tags; edited title
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The position of the reflexive pronoun "sich" in a rather LONGlong subordinate clause

1
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The position of the reflexive pronoun "sich" in a rather LONG subordinate clause

Is it more natural (or easier) to say:

... , wenn zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range sich einen Eheschwur leisten!?

rather than:

... , wenn sich zwei Menschen von unterschiedlichem Range einen Eheschwur leisten!?


I have already referred to some enlightening past posts, notably this one, but there still remains one point that I hope to clarify.

When a subordinate clause is relatively long and you place sich immediately after a conjunction, it does not seem easy to keep track of the relation between sich and the verb leisten placed at the end.

As a non-native speaker, I'm more inclined to put sich closer to leisten, but how do native speakers think about this?