2 added 455 characters in body
source | link

I know it probably does not really help you because it is not a book reference, nor instruction, but here are some quite typical examples of phonological reduction in informal speech in German:

Wennse wolln könnse gehn (for: Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie gehen)

Tschullijung! (for: Entschuldigung bitte!)

Naahmd! (for: Guten Abend)

Hasse ma ne Maak? (for: Hast du mir mal eine Mark?)

Könnse mal... (for: Könnten Sie mal...)

sozagn (for: sozusagen)

Bunsreblik (for: Bundesrepublik - quite common in politicians' utterances)

Note however that there are strong dialects in Germany, so that these contractions are not universal. They are in use where oral communication follows more or less standard German.

As for the actual question, I wonder if giving "instructions" (in the sense of: general rules to be applied) is possible at all. The only really useful instruction I can imagine would be: collect examples, and add information in what situations (level of formality of speech) they are appropriate.

Knowing these things would be a marker for real command of the language, as over-exact pronunciation is clearly a marker for non-naturalised users.

I know it probably does not really help you because it is not a book reference, but here are some quite typical examples of phonological reduction in informal speech in German:

Wennse wolln könnse gehn (for: Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie gehen)

Tschullijung! (for: Entschuldigung bitte!)

Naahmd! (for: Guten Abend)

Hasse ma ne Maak? (for: Hast du mir mal eine Mark?)

Könnse mal... (for: Könnten Sie mal...)

sozagn (for: sozusagen)

Bunsreblik (for: Bundesrepublik - quite common in politicians' utterances)

Note however that there are strong dialects in Germany, so that these contractions are not universal. They are in use where oral communication follows more or less standard German.

I know it probably does not really help you because it is not a book reference, nor instruction, but here are some quite typical examples of phonological reduction in informal speech in German:

Wennse wolln könnse gehn (for: Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie gehen)

Tschullijung! (for: Entschuldigung bitte!)

Naahmd! (for: Guten Abend)

Hasse ma ne Maak? (for: Hast du mir mal eine Mark?)

Könnse mal... (for: Könnten Sie mal...)

sozagn (for: sozusagen)

Bunsreblik (for: Bundesrepublik - quite common in politicians' utterances)

Note however that there are strong dialects in Germany, so that these contractions are not universal. They are in use where oral communication follows more or less standard German.

As for the actual question, I wonder if giving "instructions" (in the sense of: general rules to be applied) is possible at all. The only really useful instruction I can imagine would be: collect examples, and add information in what situations (level of formality of speech) they are appropriate.

Knowing these things would be a marker for real command of the language, as over-exact pronunciation is clearly a marker for non-naturalised users.

1
source | link

I know it probably does not really help you because it is not a book reference, but here are some quite typical examples of phonological reduction in informal speech in German:

Wennse wolln könnse gehn (for: Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie gehen)

Tschullijung! (for: Entschuldigung bitte!)

Naahmd! (for: Guten Abend)

Hasse ma ne Maak? (for: Hast du mir mal eine Mark?)

Könnse mal... (for: Könnten Sie mal...)

sozagn (for: sozusagen)

Bunsreblik (for: Bundesrepublik - quite common in politicians' utterances)

Note however that there are strong dialects in Germany, so that these contractions are not universal. They are in use where oral communication follows more or less standard German.