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What dialect might this be? Dialect of a story from the "Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika" (1897)

In an 1897 German cookbook ("Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika")I I found this story torn out of what may have been a compilation of short stories. The story isn’t dated, but it was included with other recipes clipped from newspapers.

The text of the story looks like German, but I could find only a few of the words in my 1934 (Fraktur) Cassell’s. I only read the first and second paragraphs of the story, and could only understand the gist of what I had read – something about selling, or not selling, a sow -- and it goes on from there.

I’m including here an extract of the first line of the first paragraph of the story, and the last line of that paragraph as an example to study.

(story title) “Die Metzelsuppe”.

[first paragraph of story begins with:] S’ Kürbsamärtes Hansjörg von Sürflingen hat auch wieder ein Säulein im Stall von beiläufig dritthalb Centner im G’wicht ...

[first paragraph ends with] ... man könnte es auch Hausbefehl heitzen, mit wenigen Worten: dui Sau mutz in der Famile bleiba, es ist a guate Art, dia fritzt ner umsust, dia geit Schmalz, so a Sau verkauft mer net.

[ende]

As a result of my failure, my guess is that the story is written in some dialect of German. And if this is so, what dialect might it be, and where would it commonly be heard? (The story’s text is in Fraktur font, which I’ve ‘romanized’ for this query)

What dialect might this be?

In an 1897 German cookbook ("Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika")I found this story torn out of what may have been a compilation of short stories. The story isn’t dated, but it was included with other recipes clipped from newspapers.

The text of the story looks like German, but I could find only a few of the words in my 1934 (Fraktur) Cassell’s. I only read the first and second paragraphs of the story, and could only understand the gist of what I had read – something about selling, or not selling, a sow -- and it goes on from there.

I’m including here an extract of the first line of the first paragraph of the story, and the last line of that paragraph as an example to study.

(story title) “Die Metzelsuppe”.

[first paragraph of story begins with:] S’ Kürbsamärtes Hansjörg von Sürflingen hat auch wieder ein Säulein im Stall von beiläufig dritthalb Centner im G’wicht ...

[first paragraph ends with] ... man könnte es auch Hausbefehl heitzen, mit wenigen Worten: dui Sau mutz in der Famile bleiba, es ist a guate Art, dia fritzt ner umsust, dia geit Schmalz, so a Sau verkauft mer net.

[ende]

As a result of my failure, my guess is that the story is written in some dialect of German. And if this is so, what dialect might it be, and where would it commonly be heard? (The story’s text is in Fraktur font, which I’ve ‘romanized’ for this query)

Dialect of a story from the "Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika" (1897)

In an 1897 German cookbook (Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika) I found this story torn out of what may have been a compilation of short stories. The story isn’t dated, but it was included with other recipes clipped from newspapers.

The text of the story looks like German, but I could find only a few of the words in my 1934 (Fraktur) Cassell’s. I only read the first and second paragraphs of the story, and could only understand the gist of what I had read – something about selling, or not selling, a sow -- and it goes on from there.

I’m including here an extract of the first line of the first paragraph of the story, and the last line of that paragraph as an example to study.

(story title) “Die Metzelsuppe”.

[first paragraph of story begins with:] S’ Kürbsamärtes Hansjörg von Sürflingen hat auch wieder ein Säulein im Stall von beiläufig dritthalb Centner im G’wicht ...

[first paragraph ends with] ... man könnte es auch Hausbefehl heitzen, mit wenigen Worten: dui Sau mutz in der Famile bleiba, es ist a guate Art, dia fritzt ner umsust, dia geit Schmalz, so a Sau verkauft mer net.

[ende]

As a result of my failure, my guess is that the story is written in some dialect of German. And if this is so, what dialect might it be, and where would it commonly be heard? (The story’s text is in Fraktur font, which I’ve ‘romanized’ for this query)

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1
source | link

What dialect might this be?

In an 1897 German cookbook ("Koch-Buch für die Deutschen in Amerika")I found this story torn out of what may have been a compilation of short stories. The story isn’t dated, but it was included with other recipes clipped from newspapers.

The text of the story looks like German, but I could find only a few of the words in my 1934 (Fraktur) Cassell’s. I only read the first and second paragraphs of the story, and could only understand the gist of what I had read – something about selling, or not selling, a sow -- and it goes on from there.

I’m including here an extract of the first line of the first paragraph of the story, and the last line of that paragraph as an example to study.

(story title) “Die Metzelsuppe”.

[first paragraph of story begins with:] S’ Kürbsamärtes Hansjörg von Sürflingen hat auch wieder ein Säulein im Stall von beiläufig dritthalb Centner im G’wicht ...

[first paragraph ends with] ... man könnte es auch Hausbefehl heitzen, mit wenigen Worten: dui Sau mutz in der Famile bleiba, es ist a guate Art, dia fritzt ner umsust, dia geit Schmalz, so a Sau verkauft mer net.

[ende]

As a result of my failure, my guess is that the story is written in some dialect of German. And if this is so, what dialect might it be, and where would it commonly be heard? (The story’s text is in Fraktur font, which I’ve ‘romanized’ for this query)