2 edited body
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This is not a matter of regional variations of pronunciation. This is pronouncespronounced everywhere the same.

But we are talking here about two distinct verbs, one of them is separable, the other not, which have different pronunciations and different meanings.

  1. not separable
    Etwas umfahren = um etwas herum fahren (to drive around something)
    Pronunciation: [ʊmˈfaːʀən]; the second syllable is stressed (umFAHren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte umfahren Sie das Hindernis.
    Please drive around the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (umFAHren)
    You said, I should drive around the obstacle.

  2. separable
    Etwas umfahren = beim Fahren so heftig gegen etwas stoßen, dass es umfällt (crash so strong against something when driving, that it topples down)
    Pronunciation: [ˈʊmfaːʀən]; the first syllable is stressed (UMfahren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte fahren Sie das Hindernis um.
    Please drive over the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (UMfahren)
    You said, I should drive over the obstacle.

When this is spoken, there is no misunderstanding, because of the different pronunciations of the both verbs, and this is true everywhere where German is spoken and heard. But pronunciation is not visible in written texts, so in written texts (like in the cartoon above) there will be misunderstandings, and this again is true everywhere where German is written and read.

This is not a matter of regional variations of pronunciation. This is pronounces everywhere the same.

But we are talking here about two distinct verbs, one of them is separable, the other not, which have different pronunciations and different meanings.

  1. not separable
    Etwas umfahren = um etwas herum fahren (to drive around something)
    Pronunciation: [ʊmˈfaːʀən]; the second syllable is stressed (umFAHren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte umfahren Sie das Hindernis.
    Please drive around the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (umFAHren)
    You said, I should drive around the obstacle.

  2. separable
    Etwas umfahren = beim Fahren so heftig gegen etwas stoßen, dass es umfällt (crash so strong against something when driving, that it topples down)
    Pronunciation: [ˈʊmfaːʀən]; the first syllable is stressed (UMfahren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte fahren Sie das Hindernis um.
    Please drive over the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (UMfahren)
    You said, I should drive over the obstacle.

When this is spoken, there is no misunderstanding, because of the different pronunciations of the both verbs, and this is true everywhere where German is spoken and heard. But pronunciation is not visible in written texts, so in written texts (like in the cartoon above) there will be misunderstandings, and this again is true everywhere where German is written and read.

This is not a matter of regional variations of pronunciation. This is pronounced everywhere the same.

But we are talking here about two distinct verbs, one of them is separable, the other not, which have different pronunciations and different meanings.

  1. not separable
    Etwas umfahren = um etwas herum fahren (to drive around something)
    Pronunciation: [ʊmˈfaːʀən]; the second syllable is stressed (umFAHren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte umfahren Sie das Hindernis.
    Please drive around the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (umFAHren)
    You said, I should drive around the obstacle.

  2. separable
    Etwas umfahren = beim Fahren so heftig gegen etwas stoßen, dass es umfällt (crash so strong against something when driving, that it topples down)
    Pronunciation: [ˈʊmfaːʀən]; the first syllable is stressed (UMfahren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte fahren Sie das Hindernis um.
    Please drive over the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (UMfahren)
    You said, I should drive over the obstacle.

When this is spoken, there is no misunderstanding, because of the different pronunciations of the both verbs, and this is true everywhere where German is spoken and heard. But pronunciation is not visible in written texts, so in written texts (like in the cartoon above) there will be misunderstandings, and this again is true everywhere where German is written and read.

1
source | link

This is not a matter of regional variations of pronunciation. This is pronounces everywhere the same.

But we are talking here about two distinct verbs, one of them is separable, the other not, which have different pronunciations and different meanings.

  1. not separable
    Etwas umfahren = um etwas herum fahren (to drive around something)
    Pronunciation: [ʊmˈfaːʀən]; the second syllable is stressed (umFAHren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte umfahren Sie das Hindernis.
    Please drive around the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (umFAHren)
    You said, I should drive around the obstacle.

  2. separable
    Etwas umfahren = beim Fahren so heftig gegen etwas stoßen, dass es umfällt (crash so strong against something when driving, that it topples down)
    Pronunciation: [ˈʊmfaːʀən]; the first syllable is stressed (UMfahren)

    The driving instructor said:

    Bitte fahren Sie das Hindernis um.
    Please drive over the obstacle.

    In indirect speech this is:

    Sie haben gesagt, ich soll das Hindernis umfahren. (UMfahren)
    You said, I should drive over the obstacle.

When this is spoken, there is no misunderstanding, because of the different pronunciations of the both verbs, and this is true everywhere where German is spoken and heard. But pronunciation is not visible in written texts, so in written texts (like in the cartoon above) there will be misunderstandings, and this again is true everywhere where German is written and read.