3 typo
source | link

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

Using 'von' denoting somebody's provenance has a quaint connotation reminding of close-knit and archaic communities where people are usually addressed by their given names, not being known by their family name but rather by their community affiliation:

  • Ich bin Hans von Ramsau ( I am John of Ramsau )

A possible reason might be that a family name may carry less information than the location of residence, especially in communities where family names are still closely related to occupation or role in life ( 'Miller', 'Smith' ) - you'd have 'Miller's in about every village of a region, while the village names probably differ.

Note that this is not to be confused with the titles of the nobility ( eg. Graf August von Hohenzollern [ Count August, HauseHouse of Hohenzollern ] ).

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

Using 'von' denoting somebody's provenance has a quaint connotation reminding of close-knit and archaic communities where people are usually addressed by their given names, not being known by their family name but rather by their community affiliation:

  • Ich bin Hans von Ramsau ( I am John of Ramsau )

A possible reason might be that a family name may carry less information than the location of residence, especially in communities where family names are still closely related to occupation or role in life ( 'Miller', 'Smith' ) - you'd have 'Miller's in about every village of a region, while the village names probably differ.

Note that this is not to be confused with the titles of the nobility ( eg. Graf August von Hohenzollern [ Count August, Hause of Hohenzollern ] ).

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

Using 'von' denoting somebody's provenance has a quaint connotation reminding of close-knit and archaic communities where people are usually addressed by their given names, not being known by their family name but rather by their community affiliation:

  • Ich bin Hans von Ramsau ( I am John of Ramsau )

A possible reason might be that a family name may carry less information than the location of residence, especially in communities where family names are still closely related to occupation or role in life ( 'Miller', 'Smith' ) - you'd have 'Miller's in about every village of a region, while the village names probably differ.

Note that this is not to be confused with the titles of the nobility ( eg. Graf August von Hohenzollern [ Count August, House of Hohenzollern ] ).

2 typo
source | link

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

Using 'von' denoting somebody's provenance has a quaint connotation reminding of close-knit and archaic communities where people are usually addressed by their given names, not being known by their family name but rather by their community affiliation:

  • Ich bin Hans von Ramsau ( I am John of Ramsau )

A possible reason might be that a family name may carry less information than the location of residence, especially in communities where family names are still closely related to occupation or role in life ( 'Miller', 'Smith' ) - you'd have 'Miller's in about every village of a region, while the village names probably differ.

Note that this is not to be confused with the titles of the nobility ( eg. Graf August von Hohenzollern [ Count August, Hause of Hohenzollern ] ).

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)

Using 'von' denoting somebody's provenance has a quaint connotation reminding of close-knit and archaic communities where people are usually addressed by their given names, not being known by their family name but rather by their community affiliation:

  • Ich bin Hans von Ramsau ( I am John of Ramsau )

A possible reason might be that a family name may carry less information than the location of residence, especially in communities where family names are still closely related to occupation or role in life ( 'Miller', 'Smith' ) - you'd have 'Miller's in about every village of a region, while the village names probably differ.

Note that this is not to be confused with the titles of the nobility ( eg. Graf August von Hohenzollern [ Count August, Hause of Hohenzollern ] ).

1
source | link

The difference in meaning mirrors the difference between provenance and travel origin.

'Aus' would typically mean that the denoted location is the place of birth or long-time residency, regardless of the geographical status:

  • aus Laim ( from Laim, a Munich borough])
  • aus München ( from Munich )
  • aus Bayern ( from Bavaria )
  • aus Deutschland ( from Germany )
  • aus den Alpen ( from the Alps )

In this context, 'stammen' can usually stand in for the verb 'kommen'.

'Von' refers to an origin of travel and is often used in the context of a travel description or route discussion

  • ich komme von München und fahre nach Köln
    (I'm coming from Munich and go to Cologne)